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Nostalgia & History > UP randomness from the eighties


Date: 12/11/12 23:16
UP randomness from the eighties
Author: oyw

The Union Pacific doesn't command nearly as much attention here as the SP, but despite running far fewer trains than Santa Fe and SP, the UP had its moments here in Southern California during the 1980's. Here is a random sampling, mostly taken on Santa Fe trackage, from when times were a bit more interesting.

1) GP30 719 is returning cab-hop to Montclair as it passes through Ontario(CA) in December of 1980. By this time, the only remaining part of the old UP station was the loading dock.

2) A pair of Missouri Pacific SD40-2's trail UP SD40 3015 on a grain train stopped at Rana, located between San Bernardino and Colton on the Santa Fe, on March 28, 1981.

3) A few weeks later on April 22, I found SD45 41 waiting for a signal at Verdemont on Santa Fe's 1st District. After continuing through Cajon, the train will rejoin UP rails at Daggett.








Date: 12/11/12 23:17
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: oyw

4) Leaving a stormy Cajon Pass in its dust, SD40-2 3403 leads a hot westbound van train through Ono. Taken on May 1, 1983, the track to the right is the spur for the old Culligan plant in San Bernardino.

5) One of my favorite times, the early 80's brought the "second coming" for 25 of UP's Centennial locomotives. On a hazy June 29, 1984, 6923 is in charge of the westbound CLS at Colton, once again on the Santa Fe.

6) Several years later in June of 1988, a pair of ex-MoP B23-7's 176 and 164 accelerate out of Mira Loma with the Montclair roadswitcher after working the TTX Cal Pro facility. These GE's are still around having been rebuilt into Genset switchers, UPY 2604 and 2632.

That will do for now, thanks for looking back with me.

OYW



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/11/12 23:56 by oyw.








Date: 12/11/12 23:41
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: cates625

Did UP ever repower their 45's?



Date: 12/12/12 01:00
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: john1082

cates625 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Did UP ever repower their 45's?


I believe that they tinkered with a Sulzer rebuilt or two and perhaps a Caterpillar experiment.

John Gezelius
Tustin, CA



Date: 12/12/12 01:17
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: coach

It's very interesting seeing so many UP units without snowplows, and instead flat face coupler ends. What did they do when they hit snow packs??



Date: 12/12/12 03:44
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: rschonfelder

I'm surprised to see the Caboose with the still square windows in 1980. Usually they had put in those sealed windows which were given away by the circular corners.

Rick



Date: 12/12/12 05:51
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: sp8192

That UP 3403 shot is killer!! I bet he blew your hat off when he came hammering by!!



Date: 12/12/12 06:26
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: santafe199

Great stuff, Bob! It sure was a fun time for UP fans with all that variety...

Lance



Date: 12/12/12 08:55
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: SP8595

Great photos and scans Bob! I like the location on that shot with the Centennial.



Date: 12/12/12 09:59
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: rantoul

Thanks for the great photos. Why was UP on the Santa Fe and not their own LA&SL line?



Date: 12/12/12 10:01
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: RplusLJetService

Yes, love them all. Great memories of home.

Adam



Date: 12/12/12 10:15
Re: UP Colton
Author: timz2

> Why was UP on the
> Santa Fe and not their own LA&SL line?

There never was an LA&SL between Barstow
and Riverside.



Date: 12/12/12 11:56
Re: UP Colton
Author: davew833

According to Don Strack, UP had six Sulzer-powered SD45's. They were not successful and were removed from service after a brief career.

http://utahrails.net/articles/up-sd45s.php



Date: 12/12/12 13:11
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: YukonYeti

Regarding the units hitting snow packs. This was a very dangerous situation as units could easily be derailed even with snow depths of less than 8 inches. This was due to the light axle loading of Union Pacific locomotives especially the 6900's and SD45's. The reason why these diesel were so light is when these units were retired, it was planned they could be sold for use in Brasil. Since Brasil does not have much snow, this was a very logical proposition. It should be noted power belonging to other railroads, without plows, such as the CB&Q, PC, EL etc. were much heavier and could take on whatever Old Man Winter could dish out.

Union Pacific units without plows were not allowed to run in the winter unless the engineer had a signed letter from the US Weather Bureau authorizing movement. In the event they were caught in a snow storm, they had to proceed to the nearest snow shelter at a speed not exceed 8.7 MPH and be prepared for long term storage. All fluids had to be drained, batteries removed and the biffy cleaned.

Hope this clarifies the question...



Date: 12/12/12 13:15
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: YukonYeti

One more item... You will note on Union Pacific power all of the hoses hanging across the pilot. Some units were modified with an air plow. High pressure air was forced over the rail thus clearing snow. Most if not all 6900's were equipped with this system allowing year round operation.



Date: 12/12/12 13:17
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: NYSWSD70M

cates625 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Did UP ever repower their 45's?


6 of them numbered 60-65.



Date: 12/12/12 17:17
Re: UP randomness from the eighties
Author: Evan_Werkema

YukonYeti Wrote:

> One more item... You will note on Union Pacific
> power all of the hoses hanging across the pilot.
> Some units were modified with an air plow.

Any bridges for sale at the present time?



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