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Eastern Railroad Discussion > What is 3 point protection?


Date: 02/08/01 10:54
What is 3 point protection?
Author: jmandym

I enjoy watching the action at Radnor Yards in Nashville. I frequently hear the term "three point protection" over the scanner. What does this term mean?



Date: 02/08/01 11:52
RE: What is 3 point protection?
Author: lew

Set the automatic brake valve and indenpendent brake, center the reverser handle, and drop the generator field switch to the off position, thereby preventing any unexpected movement of the train or engine.



Date: 02/08/01 15:57
RE: What is 3 point protection?
Author: clinchfield3000

lew wrote:
>
> Set the automatic brake valve and indenpendent brake,
> center the reverser handle, and drop the generator field switch
> to the off position, thereby preventing any unexpected movement
> of the train or engine.

Also called T-19 on CSX.

Michael Ridenhour



Date: 02/08/01 19:23
RE: What is 3 point protection?
Author: KNTower

And now 3-point is being used on NS ... we've been hearing it all day starting today here on the Piedmont Division.

KN Tower



Date: 02/08/01 21:58
RE: What is 3 point protection?
Author: clinchfield3000

In order for any part of your body to invaid the space between two cars you must obtain a T-19(CSX) or 3-point protection. After you are through doing what ever you were doing you must release your T-19 or 3-point protection. You also must obtain a T-19 or 3-point protection if you are putting on an EOT on the rear or if you are doing something to the front of the Engine. All of this of course only applies when there is an occupied Locomotive coupled to the cars you are working on.

Michael Ridenhour
WSSB Brakeman



Date: 02/09/01 05:55
RE: What is 3 point protection?
Author: fdifalco

"Three point protection"

Correct name is Three Step Protection. This was apparently begun with Conrail and has been inherited by CSX. It formalizes the process that engineers have used for years to secure engines and their attached trains (cars) while employees foul said equipment to connect air hoses, align couplers, etc.

The rule can be found in the Safe Job Procedures section (rule 19) of CSX's Safe Way and Safe Job Procedures book. It states that the engineer must place the:

1. Independent brake in the FULL APPLICATION position; and, if necessary, make a brake pipe reduction sufficient to hold the equipment.
2. Reverse lever in the CENTER position.
3. Generator field switch in the OFF position.

Frank DiFalco



Date: 02/09/01 16:05
3 point vs. 3 step
Author: golfer

The confusion in terms comes about because railroads require 3 POINT contact whenever you are on equipment, i.e. three of your four limbs (hands, feet) must remain in firm contact with the equipment, while the fourth, e.g., free hand, may be used to perform a task such as apply/release a hand brake, signal, etc. (Maybe thats why it's not called a "handS" brake)

The protection required before fouling equipment is called 3 STEP protection for the reasons already discussed.



Date: 02/09/01 19:58
RE: 3 point protection
Author: railrider

I was on Amtrak 91 today and overheard a reference to "three point protection" on my scanner when they dropped the two road railers off the back end at the station in Jax. I too was wondering what this meant - now I know. I believe the word "point" was uesd but it's been a long day and they might have said "step". Thanks



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