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Steam & Excursion > Whazzit? (29)


Date: 02/14/20 07:09
Whazzit? (29)
Author: LarryDoyle

This one's probably too easy for you guys.

-LD




Date: 02/14/20 07:12
Re: Whazzit? (29)
Author: LoggerHogger

That is a blurry shot of a headlight switch.

Martin



Date: 02/14/20 07:21
Re: Whazzit? (29)
Author: HotWater

LoggerHogger Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> That is a blurry shot of a headlight switch.
>
> Martin

Right. Pyle-National headlight control switch, with the resistor mounted on top.



Date: 02/14/20 07:58
Re: Whazzit? (29)
Author: aehouse

Damn. I thought it was a cheese grater.



Date: 02/14/20 10:13
Re: Whazzit? (29)
Author: LarryDoyle

HotWater Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> LoggerHogger Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > That is a blurry shot of a headlight switch.
> >
> > Martin
>
> Right. Pyle-National headlight control switch,
> with the resistor mounted on top.

Yes, of course.  These were nearly universal on steam locomotives that had turbo generators, and on into the first decades of diesels.  The resistor Jack pointed out is, fo course, for the dim settings - and it would get quite hot.  A variation on this design is to have the resistor(s) as separate units.

There were two versions.  The one shown is a five position switch for Front Dim, Front Full, Off, Rear Full, and Rear Dim.  There was also a three position version with Full, Dim, and Off for control of a single light, so two were used on engines with front and rear lights.

The advantage of the 5 position switch is that you only have one switch to control both lights.
The disadvantage of the 5 position switch is that you only have one switch to control both lights.

These switches were mounted on the top of the cab sidewall above the engineers window, or on the ceiling above the engineer if the arch of the cab roof was too deep to allow space on the wall.

The headlight was, of course, for illumination.  But it was also a signal at a meet.  The headlight was left turned on, usually dim, until the rear of the train was in the clear of the main and switch properly aligned.  Until the headlight of a train turned out to meet another train is extinguished, it is an indication that the main track is obstructed.  The opposing train must approach prepared to stop before passing the headlight and if the head end of the train is clear of the main track, may proceed only at restricted speed to the point where the main track may be obstructed.

-LD



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/14/20 10:48 by LarryDoyle.



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