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Date: 11/14/16 03:16
Evening Star
Author: 86235

No, not that one.

This one, 66779 the last ever class 66 to roll off the Progress Rail production line in Muncie, IN. Last week it was employed by GBRf on the Southampton Docks to Mountfield (East Sussex) and vv containerised gypsum train (it's on it again this week too). Here it is on Friday approaching Tonbridge and on Saturday (in rather different conditions) crossing Voltaire Road Junction in South London. As well as sporting a commemorative bell, it wears the same lined out Brunswick Green livery as it's predecessor, 90220, which emerged from Swindon in 1960. 



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/14/16 03:17 by 86235.






Date: 11/14/16 06:49
Re: Evening Star
Author: march_hare

In thw second photo, what is that Y-shaped rail in the middle of the track, two tracks to the left of the train?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/14/16 06:49 by march_hare.



Date: 11/14/16 07:28
Re: Evening Star
Author: 86235

march_hare Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> In thw second photo, what is that Y-shaped rail in
> the middle of the track, two tracks to the left of
> the train?

Looks like a section of a switch either awaiting recovery or installation



Date: 11/14/16 13:43
Re: Evening Star
Author: spflow

I can't help thinking that the attempt to compare the significance of the last class 66 loco with no 92220,  the last steam loco built in the UK, is a bit far fetched. The contruction of the latter was an event of truly historic proportions, marking the end of a tradition lasting over 150 years in the country where the steam locomotive and the railway itself was born. The class 66 business is just a bit of trainspotting nerdiness.

I don't accuse Nick of this hyperbole, indeed is the diesel actually named or just decked out in a funny paint scheme?

PS always lovely pictures, thanks!
 



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 11/14/16 13:54 by spflow.



Date: 11/14/16 14:03
Re: Evening Star
Author: exhaustED

spflow Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I can't help think that the attempt to compare the
> significance of the last class 66 loco with no
> 92220. the last steam loco built in the UK is a
> bit far fetched. The contruction of the latter was
> an event of truly historic proportions, marking
> the end of a tradition lasting over 150 years in
> the country where the steam locomotive and the
> railway itself was born. The class 66 business is
> just a bit of trainspotting nerdiness.
>
> I don't accuse Nick of this hyperbole, indeed is
> the diesel actually named or just decked out in a
> funny pain scheme?
>  

It's a bit more significant than nerdiness, if not quite as significant as the end of steam... The class 66 really did revolutionise the freight game in the UK. It enabled the privatised rail business in the UK to offer a serious/competitive service to customers. Far more 66's have been built for the UK than any other diesel in the modern era, which illustrates the successfulness and significance of its design.
66779 is named 'Evening Star.'



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 11/14/16 14:09 by exhaustED.



Date: 11/14/16 14:39
Re: Evening Star
Author: 86235

spflow Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I can't help thinking that the attempt to compare
> the significance of the last class 66 loco with no
> 92220,  the last steam loco built in the UK, is a
> bit far fetched. The construction of the latter was
> an event of truly historic proportions, marking
> the end of a tradition lasting over 150 years in
> the country where the steam locomotive and the
> railway itself was born. The class 66 business is
> just a bit of trainspotting nerdiness.

GBRf's MD John Smith is a railfan, so I imagine he will understand the significance of 90220 Evening Star. If anything naming the last 66 after the last steam locomotive - which itself was a heavy haul freight locomotive - is a homage to the original. And 66779 does look rather splendid in its ersatz BR express passenger livery (which was as ersatz on 90220 as it is on 66779) complete with lion herald and nameplate (yes, it is named Evening Star) and bell. I would say it's celebrating our railway heritage, and hopefully it will remain in service for slightly longer than its namesake.

But GBRf has 'form' in linking the present day scene with railway history. 66715 sports copies of the nameplates worn by Great Central 9P 4-cylinder 4-6-0 1165 Valour, their World War One memorial locomotive. Today's 66715 serves a similar purpose, I don't think anyone would suggest that's trainspotting nerdiness. 66707 is named after the Great Central's legendary General Manager Sir Sam Fay (as were the GC's B2 4-6-0s) who Smith admires (he's something of a GC fan). Then you have the various 66s named after London Underground notables and the 73s that GBRf acquired are named after women members of GBRf staff. It's a very eclectic naming policy

My personal favourite is 66714 Cromer Lifeboat, simply because I like Cromer and my ancestors come from that part of North Norfolk. Why Cromer lifeboat? Presumably because it's coxswain (skipper) for 37 years (1910 - 1947) was the most celebrated, most decorated lifeboatman in the history of the RNLI, Henry Blogg.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/14/16 14:40 by 86235.



Date: 11/15/16 01:32
Re: Evening Star
Author: spflow

Haha! It's always good to stir up a little bit of a (hopefully good-natured) argument.

I must agree that having a railfan in charge of GBRF is a good thing, and that naming locos is also following a great tradition. I'm just gettimg a bit cynical when names get changed or replaced according to commercial whims of.

I think the rot set in in 1957 when the Jubilee "Goild Coast" got renamed "Ghana". I have no probelm at all in celebrating Commonwealth Independance, but even then it felt like rewriting history. Did any other locos get renamed in a similar way?

I was very thrilled when some class 87 electrics were named afer Rainhill trial locos and other greats in early railway history, but the plates never lasted and the names were sometimes replaced by some tawdry sponsor or TV celebrity.

"Cromer Lifeboat" is just perfect - "Alan Partridge" would be the pits!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/15/16 08:30 by spflow.



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