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European Railroad Discussion > Mr. Brown Visits the SR This Week


Date: 12/15/20 08:34
Mr. Brown Visits the SR This Week
Author: gbmott

A few older SR designs for this week.  

1.  30855 Robert Blake - Basingstoke 5-30-56
2.  30740 Merlin - Oxford 5-21-56
3.  30322 - Nine Elms 7-56

 Gordon








Date: 12/15/20 08:38
Re: Mr. Brown Visits the SR This Week
Author: 86235

The first shot is outstanding, a Lord Nelson on the passenger, presumably either a Bournemouth or West of England express and what looks like an S15 4-6-0 on a freight. Commences frothing :-)



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 12/15/20 08:40 by 86235.



Date: 12/15/20 09:00
Re: Mr. Brown Visits the SR This Week
Author: JohnMcIvor

Yes the 'Nelson' is heading a London Waterloo to Bournemouth express and the freight on the right is from London Nine Elms to Southampton Docks. Great photos thanks. The white discs (lamps at night) on the front of the loco indicated the route of the train to signalmen (interlocking tower operators) etc on the Southern Region of British Railways.
John McIvor
svsfilm.com
Farnham, England.



Date: 12/15/20 12:24
Re: Mr. Brown Visits the SR This Week
Author: lynnpowell

Did freight cars from railways in "mainland Europe" get ferried across the channel in order to deliver goods to the UK?  Was "mainland European" rolling stock "oversize" for the UK's loading gauge?



Date: 12/15/20 12:37
Re: Mr. Brown Visits the SR This Week
Author: 86235

lynnpowell Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Did freight cars from railways in "mainland
> Europe" get ferried across the channel in order to
> deliver goods to the UK?  Was "mainland European"
> rolling stock "oversize" for the UK's loading
> gauge?

Quite straightforward, the answer is no, ordinary Continental stock is too big. When the train ferry was introduced, late 1930s, specially made stock was used.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/15/20 12:38 by 86235.



Date: 12/15/20 19:33
Re: Mr. Brown Visits the SR This Week
Author: gbmott

Was the Great Central not constructed to the European loading gauge?   I accept that Continental wagon did not ever, in fact,make it to Britain, but was that a matter of not having a cleared route from any port to a point on the GC?  In hindsight, of course, . . . . .     Regarding headcodes, were they used only by the Southern/Southern Region? 

Gordon



Date: 12/15/20 23:15
Re: Mr. Brown Visits the SR This Week
Author: 86235

gbmott Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Was the Great Central not constructed to the
> European loading gauge?   I accept that
> Continental wagon did not ever, in fact,make it to
> Britain, but was that a matter of not having a
> cleared route from any port to a point on the
> GC?  In hindsight, of course, . . . . . 
>
> Gordon

No, the GC London Extension was not built to a European loading gauge, indeed there was no European standard until the Berne convention in 1912. The GC was certainly built to a more generous loading gauge, in later years GC locomotives which were redeployed elsewhere had to have changes to their boiler fittings, most notably a visually horrible flower pot stack.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/15/20 23:26 by 86235.



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