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Date: 01/11/17 16:56
Another Weathering Project
Author: philhoov

I continue learning more about weathering rolling stock.
This is my 4th and latest effort.
This one began as yet another ScaleTrains Evans boxcar.
Those cars are excellent, inexpensive cars to use as a basis for learning.
I applied a misting of Krylon Matte Finish first (similar to DullCote) and also after each application of various treatments.
I applied a homemade wash of dark blue artist oil, thinned substantially with mineral spirits, to start.
Then, I used a variety of artist oils, artist pencils, and finished it off with Pan Pastel powders.
The crusty, rusty roof was done with artist oil Burnt Sienna, followed by Pan Pastel rust tapped onto the wet paint from a dry paint brush.
I have a small space heater that I use to speed up drying times.
Then, a final misting of Krylon Matte Finish.
Phil






Date: 01/11/17 17:19
Re: Another Weathering Project
Author: Setandcentered

Looks good!

Dave

Posted from Android



Date: 01/11/17 18:24
Re: Another Weathering Project
Author: algoma11

Looks great-practise makes perfect!

Mike Bannon
St Catharines, ON



Date: 01/11/17 20:38
Re: Another Weathering Project
Author: 70ACE

The roof is excellant, but the sides don't share the same "inspirational look". Perhaps too much paint thinner wash?



Date: 01/11/17 20:57
Re: Another Weathering Project
Author: philhoov

I tried to tone down the sides and ends of this one after more severe weathering on my last project.
I posted my last one on TO and got criticized for overdoing it.
The reality of weathering is that there are no rules.
Some (real) cars get more weathered than others, depending on where they spend their lives, how they were built, how long in service, weather conditions, etc.
There's also the issue of photos vs. the actual model.
This car isn't as bright as it is in the photos.
Phil
 



Date: 01/11/17 23:59
Re: Another Weathering Project
Author: Stottman

I am "just starting" as well, and have found oil washes to be harder to control. So I have been using "dry brushing" instead. 

Also, trying to speed up the process with a space heater (not sure how that works with oils anyway) seems to defeat the purpose of using an oil wash.

I have found it better to have 4-6 projects in the pile, and just rotate while the others dry. 



Date: 01/12/17 08:32
Re: Another Weathering Project
Author: philhoov

We're both learning as we go.
I first tried alcohol-based washes and found they don't really do much.
Then, I tried acrylic paints and pretty much ruined a UP boxcar, then ended up soaking it in dish soap and scrubbing off (most of) what I had applied.
But, it was still a mess.
After that, I did a couple more cars with acrylics and Pan Pastels, each with better/improving results.
This B&M car was mostly done with artist oils and I was careful to not overdo it on the sides/ends.
I did go pretty heavy with the roof rust, which was done with artist oil Burnt Sienna and Umber with Pan Pastels sprinkled from a dry paint brush into the still-wet oil paint.
I like the nasty, crusty look of that.
I also tried artist pencils on the side ribs and want to experiment with that technique more in the future.
Pan Pastels are probably the easiest to use because you can apply them with a soft, broad brush or a makeup sponge and move them around/dust them off.
I continue to learn with each car.
Worst that could happen is that I totally ruin a $15 car and toss it, which is nearly impossible to do.
I still feel like I don't know what I'm doing, but when I look back at my first attempt, I realize I've come a long way.
The creativity is the most fun for me.
One big lesson learned: There are many ways to weather.
Phil



Date: 01/13/17 01:11
Re: Another Weathering Project
Author: Stottman

That is one reason I only use oils. They take awhile to dry, so if I make a mistake, then it can be cleaned up rather easily. 

And remember "artist oils" are not oil based like you are thinking. Linseed oil is what is traditionally used. 



Date: 01/13/17 04:36
Re: Another Weathering Project
Author: jalang

Dumb question. Where's a good source for artist oils? I see a lot on Amazon.com even - but which type is correct for this application (the not-so-fast-drying type described above)?

Thanks!

J. Alex Lang
Pittsburgh, PA



Date: 01/13/17 06:11
Re: Another Weathering Project
Author: Stottman

Artist oils are a mainstay at any "artist supply store". 

"Michael's" Is a big box version out west, not sure if you have them in PA. 



Date: 01/13/17 16:28
Re: Another Weathering Project
Author: Larry020

Stottman Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Artist oils are a mainstay at any "artist supply
> store". 
>
> "Michael's" Is a big box version out west, not
> sure if you have them in PA. 

It seems that there are many locations in the great State of PA.  https://www.google.com/search?q=michaels+art+locations+pennsylvania&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en&client=safari#istate=lrl:xpd

I don't know how close or far any are to you.

Larry



Date: 01/13/17 18:57
Re: Another Weathering Project
Author: 70ACE

philhoov Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> We're both learning as we go.
> I first tried alcohol-based washes and found they
> don't really do much.
> Then, I tried acrylic paints and pretty much
> ruined a UP boxcar, then ended up soaking it in
> dish soap and scrubbing off (most of) what I had
> applied.
> But, it was still a mess.
> After that, I did a couple more cars with acrylics
> and Pan Pastels, each with better/improving
> results.
> This B&M car was mostly done with artist oils and
> I was careful to not overdo it on the sides/ends.
> I did go pretty heavy with the roof rust, which
> was done with artist oil Burnt Sienna and Umber
> with Pan Pastels sprinkled from a dry paint brush
> into the still-wet oil paint.
> I like the nasty, crusty look of that.
> I also tried artist pencils on the side ribs and
> want to experiment with that technique more in the
> future.
> Pan Pastels are probably the easiest to use
> because you can apply them with a soft, broad
> brush or a makeup sponge and move them around/dust
> them off.
> I continue to learn with each car.
> Worst that could happen is that I totally ruin a
> $15 car and toss it, which is nearly impossible to
> do.
> I still feel like I don't know what I'm doing, but
> when I look back at my first attempt, I realize
> I've come a long way.
> The creativity is the most fun for me.
> One big lesson learned: There are many ways to
> weather.
> Phil

Absolutely.  Weathering cars is an art form. If you haven't already done so, check the TO archives for weathering, or weathering cars. There is one indvidual's work  you'll come across that will just "knock your socks off".



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