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Date: 04/14/17 07:51
Cattle car details
Author: Chestnut

I'm working on a few Broadway limited cattle cars HO. These are Union Pacific 1940-1950s era. I'm wanting to detail the inside of the cars. Was there hay on the floors for hauling cattle? Thanks!
Matt



Date: 04/14/17 10:39
Re: Cattle car details
Author: CPR_4000

I would think there would have to be some sort of bedding, straw, most likely. Unless they were packed in so tight that they had to stand for the whole trip.



Date: 04/14/17 12:37
Re: Cattle car details
Author: wabash2800

Yes, for the "city slickers" reference livestock, hay is food and straw is bedding. You really don't want them crapping on their food...

Victor A.Baird
http://www.erstwhilepublications.com.



Date: 04/14/17 12:42
Re: Cattle car details
Author: binder001

Chestnut Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I'm working on a few Broadway limited cattle cars
> HO. These are Union Pacific 1940-1950s era. I'm
> wanting to detail the inside of the cars. Was
> there hay on the floors for hauling cattle?
> Thanks!
> Matt

Please do note that these are NOT UP prototype stock cars.  

Gary B.
Waverly, NE



Date: 04/14/17 12:52
Re: Cattle car details
Author: CPR_4000

binder001 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Please do note that these are NOT UP prototype stock cars.  

PRR, if I'm not mistaken.



Date: 04/14/17 13:00
Re: Cattle car details
Author: Chestnut

I meant straw believe it or not I grew up on a ranch and lived in ND. So "city slicker" is far from it.
Matt

wabash2800 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Yes, for the "city
> slickers" reference livestock, hay is food and
> straw is bedding. You really don't want them
> crapping on their food...
>
> Victor A.Baird
> ​http://www.erstwhilepublications.com.



Date: 04/14/17 14:01
Re: Cattle car details
Author: LarryDoyle

CPR_4000 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I would think there would have to be some sort of
> bedding, straw, most likely. Unless they were
> packed in so tight that they had to stand for the
> whole trip.

You WANT cattle standing up the whole trip.  You pack them into the car so tight that they do not have room to maneuver to kneel or lie, and they're tight enough in the car that a coupling impact or slack run will not knock them down, possibly breaking their legs, or falling onto another animal and hurting it.  It is required that cattle be unloaded within 36 hours of loading and allowed to exercise, be fed and be watered.  Other animals had similiar regulations for their feeding and rest.  Pigs had to be hosed down with water, every 24 hours, I believe it was, when not freezing. 

Horses were not packed so tight.  Cattle can sleep standing, but horses lie down, and  have enough sense to do so if the ride gets rough.  I've seen a single race horse shipped in a box car.  One end was boarded off into a stable and the horse was allowed to stand or lie as (s)he chose.

-Larry Doyle



Date: 04/14/17 14:34
Re: Cattle car details
Author: Chestnut

Thank you Larry I may need a lot of cows then!
Matt



Date: 04/14/17 19:22
Re: Cattle car details
Author: penncentral74

The use of 'Hog drenchers' was detailed in Employe Time Tables.  The worst thing that could happen is that the hog became covered in water, causing basically hypo-thermia.

The idea was to use the penstock/deluge gun to wash the decks of the car at floor level, washing effluvia out the far side of the car, and not to get the animals wet, especially in late Spring/early Fall times.  I have a PRR employee time table that shows the use of the drenchers at East Columbus <let's see...rummage...rummage>



Date: 04/14/17 20:56
Re: Cattle car details
Author: wabash2800

I didn't mean to offend you Matt.

​Victor A. Baird
http://www.erstwhilepublications.com

Chestnut Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I meant straw believe it or not I grew up on a
> ranch and lived in ND. So "city slicker" is far
> from it.
> Matt
>
> wabash2800 Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Yes, for the "city
> > slickers" reference livestock, hay is food
> and
> > straw is bedding. You really don't want them
> > crapping on their food...
> >
> > Victor A.Baird
> > ​http://www.erstwhilepublications.com.



Date: 04/15/17 06:48
Re: Cattle car details
Author: Chestnut

No Victor, no offense taken. Have a good weekend! I will show some pictures when I'm done with one of the cars. Yeah I know the cars aren't 100% correct, but I got them cheap. I did notice that there are two floors in these cars. I suppose the cars I have are for smaller livestock?
Matt



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/15/17 06:52 by Chestnut.



Date: 04/15/17 08:20
Re: Cattle car details
Author: mamfahr

> I'm working on a few Broadway limited cattle cars
> HO. These are Union Pacific 1940-1950s era. I'm
> wanting to detail the inside of the cars. Was
> there hay on the floors for hauling cattle?

Hello Matt,

Here are some items from UP's livestock handling manual from that era that should be helpful.

I've seen numerous photos of UP livestock loading/unloading areas in that era and it was very common to see piles of sand next to the loading chutes or at the bedding / cleanout site; consistent with what's mentioned in the manual.

Take care,

Mark



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/15/17 08:24 by mamfahr.






Date: 04/15/17 09:32
Re: Cattle car details
Author: LarryDoyle

Chestnut Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> ...... I did notice that
> there are two floors in these cars. I suppose the
> cars I have are for smaller livestock?
> Matt

Yes.  There were single deck, double deck, and convertable cars.  Loading chutes would, of course, also be single or two level, as appropriate.

There were also poultry cars, with a very small compartment for an attendant to travel with the birds to feed and water them.  Wouldn't THAT be a fun job!

-John



Date: 04/15/17 09:56
Re: Cattle car details
Author: TAW

LarryDoyle Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> You WANT cattle standing up the whole trip.  You
> pack them into the car so tight that they do not
> have room to maneuver to kneel or lie, and they're
> tight enough in the car that a coupling impact or
> slack run will not knock them down, possibly
> breaking their legs, or falling onto another
> animal and hurting it.  It is required that
> cattle be unloaded within 36 hours of loading and
> allowed to exercise, be fed and be watered. 
> Other animals had similiar regulations for their
> feeding and rest.  Pigs had to be hosed down with
> water, every 24 hours, I believe it was, when not
> freezing. 

Part of the essential train information written on the trainsheet was LFW (Last Fed Watered) and the time/day for stock cars in a train. On B&OCT, the Chief would get the LFW time for the cars Run 33 picked up from Union Stock Yards. We would put in the Stock Book, a standard office journal book.Yards along with the number of cars and the type of stock. The trick man would get that on message paper http://www.trainorders.com/discussion/attachments/fullsize/233000/ARF_FWR.jpg

The chief would then give the same information to the Chief in Akron. This would then be again forwarded to the Cumberland Division when the train was called out of Willard. If there was a big service interruption, it would be up to the Chief Dispatcher to get the cars to a stock facility before the 36 hours expired.

(...something to add to authentic model railroad operation)

TAW



Date: 04/15/17 14:27
Re: Cattle car details
Author: upkpfan

Double deck cars were for hogs or sheep. upkpfan



Date: 04/16/17 16:10
Re: Cattle car details
Author: mamfahr

upkpfan Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Double deck cars were for hogs or sheep. upkpfan

Hello,

UP had many types of stock cars: single, double and triple deck.  UP had double deck cars with a "tall" lower level and a "short" upper level (floor wasn't centered height-wise) so you could load cattle on the lower level if you wanted to, or, sheep / hogs on both levels.  In the 1940s/50s most hogs moved in double deck cars.  By the mid-1960s most hogs were handled in triple deck cars.

Take care,

Mark 



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