Home Open Account Help 262 users online

International Railroad Discussion > Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards


Pages:  [ 1 ][ 2 ] [ Next ]
Current Page:1 of 2


Date: 01/15/19 03:03
Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: gobbl3gook

From the aerial cable car in Khulo I proceeded west to the city of Batumi on the Black Sea.  
Khulo story: https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4683211

It was a 1.5 day bicycle ride, on a mostly downhill route from the mountains to the sea, on a road that gradually widened into a busy 2 lane highway.  

Batumi is undergoing a boom in construction, with glassy curvy skyscrapers and "Marriott Hotel Opening Soon"-type billboards around town.  

I stayed in a tiny hostel in the old part of town, much more interesting.  It was the smallest hostel I had stayed in, with 2 dorm rooms, each the size of a small US suburban house bedroom, with 4 bunk beds each.  It made for close company, but not too many snorers or chronic foot-odor guests.  One guest was an energetic 20 year old German, who got a bunch of us to go to a nearby bar.  It was myself, a 65 yr old Canadian man, a 25 year old Dane, a couple from Byelarus, and maybe one or two others.  One bartender was Ukrainian, I don't recall the other.  

I'd been in the Caucasus for a month at that point, and it occured to me that I didn't know what continent I was on.  The Caucases are on an isthmus between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea.  The southern shore of the Black Sea is Turkey, part of Asia.  And the northern shore of the Caspian Sea is Russia, west of the Ural Mountains, and thus part of Europe.  Where did the continental boundary run from the Ural Mountains to the Black Sea?  I had no idea.  

So I started asking the question at the bar.  Nobody seemed to have a clear answer.  A few "Georgia is Georgia!  We are not somewhere else" type answers.  It was a pretty good question, I thought, to pop to an international crowd at a bar in the Caucasus...  Anyone know the answer without looking it up?    

Anyway, Batumi is the largest port in Georgia.  (Other cities, between Batumi Georgia and Sochi, Russia are currently controlled by separtist factions of debatable validity and allied with Russia).  It has a busy railroad yard, and a very busy port.  The yard was right at the north end of downtown, next to a massive market building.  With (as many former Soviet cities have) a long pedestrian bridge over the yards.  

This was around Nov 8, 2017.  

Here's a few photos: View from pedestrian bridge

1) looking east -- mountains, and outskirts of Batumi
2) looking north to the sea
3) looking west to the city  



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/15/19 03:30 by gobbl3gook.








Date: 01/15/19 03:10
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: gobbl3gook

Batumi had a busy rail scene, there were various spur tracks which got a lot of use.  

4) Action on an industrial spur track
5) Locomotive out and about in the city, doing something
6) A retired passenger train was parked on the edge of the yard.  








Date: 01/15/19 03:22
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: gobbl3gook

Bonus photos: Public market

Adjacent to the rail yards was a busy public market.  

When I travel, I like to see what the locals are doing, eat the local food, and generally stay away from tourist attractions.  There's lots of themes a person can take to do this.  For me, I visit markets, churches, train stations, ride trams, roll through the countryside on back roads on a bike, etc.  For others, maybe it's traveling on minibuses, going to Karaeoke clubs, and flying from city to city.  

The Batumi market, like many, was a real treat.  So much fresh food.  One underappreciated benefit of hosteling is that you can cook your own food, as opposed to staying in that shiny new Marriott and eating out 100% of the time...  

7) classic floors and fixtures.  Natural light.  Lots of honey and nuts
8) indoor vendors, outdoor vendors
9) fruit leather is a Georgian specialty.  The "beads on a string" are the same material as fruit leather, but are strings of walnuts dipped in the fruit pulp, dried, dipped again, etc.  

Location: https://www.google.com/maps/@41.6448942,41.652105,784m/data=!3m1!1e3


 



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/15/19 03:33 by gobbl3gook.








Date: 01/15/19 03:28
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: gobbl3gook

I have a few more photos sets from Georgia to share, then I'll be continuing on the European Board for the rest of the trip.  

Previous posts in this series: 

Kazakhstan, part 1, Almaty 2 Train Station  

https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4467027  

Kazakhstan, part 2. Trainwatching near the Almaty 1 station  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4467835  

Kazakhstan, part 3, Almaty 1 train station  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4468789  

Kazakhstan, part 4. Boarding train 41  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4469593  

Kazakhstan, part 5. Train 41 to Turkistan  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4470456  

Kazakhstan, part 6. Turkistan City  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4471336  

Kazakhstan, part 7. Silk Road Express on the steppes  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4472113  

Kazakhstan, part 8. Train 378 to Aktau  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4472772  

Kazakhstan, part 9. Train car details  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4473623  

Kazakhstan, part 10. Stations and etc.  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4474370  

Kazakhstan, part 11. Aktau City  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4475213  

Kazakhstan, Part 12. Caspian Sea Ferry: new Asia-Europe routing  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4476138  

Azerbaijan, part 1. Baku station  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4477020  

Azerbaijan, part 2. Train 664 to Balakan   
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4477815  

Azerbaijan, part 3. Balakan  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4478587  


Georgia, part 1. Mtskheta  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4495266  

Georgia, part 2. Tbilisi  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4496046  

Georgia, part 3. Train 371 to Armenia  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4496838  


Armenia, part 1.Yerevan Railway Station  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4497661  

Armenia, part 2. Regional Trains  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4498496  

Armenia, part 3. Yerevan yards  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4499320  

Armenia, part 4. Yerevan Childrens Railway  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4500760  

Armenia, part 5. Childrens Railway Station  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4501699  

Armenia, part 6. Railway museum  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4502704  

Armenia, Part 7. Boarding train 684 to Gyumri  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4515515  

Armenia, Part 8. Riding train 684  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4525133  

Armenia, part 9. Gyumri Station  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4525945  

Armenia, part 10. Streamliner meet  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4526582  

Armenia, Part 11. Gyumri roundhouse  
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4527413  

Georgia, Part 4, Akhalkalaki International Station   
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4586814
 
Re: Georgia Part 5, Abandoned Akhalkalaki Station
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4679323

Georgia part 6, no traffic on Akhaltsikhe branch
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4680533

Georgia, part 7. Aerial cable car
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4683211



Date: 01/15/19 03:50
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: GettingShort

Great trip and story, thanks for the new images!



Date: 01/15/19 15:25
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: airbrakegeezer

Great story and fascinating images of a region that gets far too little attention in this part of the world, and of which I, at least, am far too ignorant.

For me and fellow ignoramuses, could you please explain "fruit leather"? From your description of the "leather buttons", it sounds to me as though acidic fruit juice is used to tan the leather -- but I'm not knowledgeable on this sort of stuff (railroad air brakes are more my thing!), so maybe you can help...

Thanks!

Roger Lewis (airbrakegeezer)



Date: 01/15/19 16:58
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: DaveL

Roger, "fruit Leather" is made from .....fruit.
You should be able to find variations of it at your local store.

Dave



Date: 01/16/19 06:08
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: Milepost_130

I continue to enjoy your stories and images.  Thanks.



Date: 01/16/19 19:11
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: airbrakegeezer

DaveL Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Roger, "fruit Leather" is made from .....fruit.
> You should be able to find variations of it at
> your local store.
>
> Dave

Many thanks, Dave. I had never heard of it! Obviously, I should pay more attention to my local craft stores...
Roger



Date: 01/17/19 00:38
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: pennengineer

airbrakegeezer Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> DaveL Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Roger, "fruit Leather" is made from .....fruit.
> > You should be able to find variations of it at
> > your local store.
> >
> > Dave
>
> Many thanks, Dave. I had never heard of it!
> Obviously, I should pay more attention to my local
> craft stores...
> Roger

I think there's some confusion here: "fruit leather" is not a craft but rather a food, somewhat similar to fruit roll-ups in North America. The name is slightly misleading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tklapi



Date: 01/17/19 17:31
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: icancmp193

Some would argue that fruit leather would be better used for craft purposes!

TJY



Date: 01/17/19 20:16
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: airbrakegeezer

pennengineer Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> airbrakegeezer Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > DaveL Wrote:
> >
> --------------------------------------------------
>
> > -----
> > > Roger, "fruit Leather" is made from
> .....fruit.
> > > You should be able to find variations of it
> at
> > > your local store.
> > >
> > > Dave
> >
> > Many thanks, Dave. I had never heard of it!
> > Obviously, I should pay more attention to my
> local
> > craft stores...
> > Roger
>
> I think there's some confusion here: "fruit
> leather" is not a craft but rather a food,
> somewhat similar to fruit roll-ups in North
> America. The name is slightly
> misleading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tklapi

OK, now I think I understand, at last! Dried fruit that looks, feels -- and tastes -- somewhat like leather. You could have fooled me -- and did-- with the pictures. Well, even us 81-year-olds can learn something new every day! Thanks, Pennengineer!

Roger Lewis (airbrakegeezer)



Date: 01/17/19 23:38
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: Duna

Those "separtist factions of debatable validity" reside in the Republic of Abkhazia. Most of them are Abkhazians, and, having the right to self-determination, they broke away from Georgian rule. Russians are there on invitation to protect them from further Georgian aggression.



Date: 01/18/19 18:33
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: dwatry

Fabulous!  I want to go!



Date: 01/19/19 00:58
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: gobbl3gook

airbrakegeezer -- I'm glad the others helped you with the fruit leather interpretation, I hadn't been checking in on the thread.  Fruit leather, the real thing, is very tasty.  Not at all like "fruit roll ups" which seem like flattened Jolly Rancher candies.  Fruit leather -- imagine really tasty applesauce, dried so it's almost completely dry, but not quite.  Then imagine having mixed in things like persimmon pulp, pomegranite juice, grape juice, maybe spinach pulp?  And you get the wide variety of colors shown in the photo.  

pennengineer -- are you the same pennengineer that went to Kazakhstan in 2008?  https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,1707920,1707928#1707928  I enjoyed reading your post.  (Though I didn't read it until after I came back from my trip).  Did you go to Georgia in 2008 also?  

Doma -- each side seems to have some pretty good arguments, so, like I said, "debatable validity."  Luckily nobody seems to be shooting in Georgia, like they are in Azerbaijan and Ukraine...  Hopefully it stays a peaceful disagreement of opinions.  



Date: 01/19/19 08:08
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: GettingShort

Duna Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Those "separtist factions of debatable validity"
> reside in the Republic of Abkhazia. Most of them
> are Abkhazians, and, having the right to
> self-determination, they broke away from Georgian
> rule. Russians are there on invitation to protect
> them from further Georgian aggression.

Good explanation. What transpired there was typical of almost all of the four "breakaway republics", Transnistria, Abkhazia, Ossetia, and Artsakh (Nagorno-Karabakh). Under US influence countries like Moldova and Georgia instituted policies that sought to eleminate the Russia language, and replace the Russian ethnic majorities in those regions. Abkhazia was a bit of a different matter being a conflict between the Armenia Christian majority and the Azeri Muslim minority that decided to engage in some imporptu and and clumsy ethnic cleansing aimed at the Armenian majority. The Russian and local etnic populations resisted, often aided by ex-Soviet Red Army soldiers in units raised in the region along with volunteers like  Cossaks from other regions of the ex-Soviet Union. In the case on Transnistria the Russian army units had been present since WWII and were mostly natives of the Trans-Dniester,  the Russian Peace Kepping units still there are largely of the same heritage. My understand in the case of Abkhazia the Russians maintaned their presence in the region espescially the large resort hospital and leave facility in the capitol Sukum, much as how Russian Army and Navy units remained in Crimea to protect Russian naval and army instilations, as allowed by treaty after the breakup of the Soviet Union.   
It's a complicated fascinating little known bit of history. I'll add that all the breakaway states are very interesting to visit as a tourist. Each has a unique character. With the exception of Ossetia all are easy to visit with Transistria and Artsakh being the easiest, Akhhazia is probably best visited in a group as it has a bit of a wild west atmosphere. 
Two Transnistria and Abkhazia can be reached by train.
No one takes you there better than http://www.youngpioneertours.com/international-tours/unrecognized-countries/ .



Date: 01/19/19 10:15
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: Duna

GettingShort Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Duna Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Those "separtist factions of debatable
> validity"
> > reside in the Republic of Abkhazia. Most of
> them
> > are Abkhazians, and, having the right to
> > self-determination, they broke away from
> Georgian
> > rule. Russians are there on invitation to
> protect
> > them from further Georgian aggression.
>
> Good explanation. What transpired there was
> typical of almost all of the four "breakaway
> republics", Transnistria, Abkhazia, Ossetia, and
> Artsakh (Nagorno-Karabakh). Under US influence
> countries like Moldova and Georgia instituted
> policies that sought to eleminate the Russia
> language, and replace the Russian ethnic
> majorities in those regions. Abkhazia was a bit of
> a different matter being a conflict between the
> Armenia Christian majority and the Azeri Muslim
> minority that decided to engage in some imporptu
> and and clumsy ethnic cleansing aimed at the
> Armenian majority. The Russian and local etnic
> populations resisted, often aided by ex-Soviet Red
> Army soldiers in units raised in the region along
> with volunteers like  Cossaks from other regions
> of the ex-Soviet Union. In the case on
> Transnistria the Russian army units had been
> present since WWII and were mostly natives of the
> Trans-Dniester,  the Russian Peace Kepping units
> still there are largely of the same heritage. My
> understand in the case of Abkhazia the Russians
> maintaned their presence in the region espescially
> the large resort hospital and leave facility in
> the capitol Sukum, much as how Russian Army and
> Navy units remained in Crimea to protect Russian
> naval and army instilations, as allowed by treaty
> after the breakup of the Soviet Union.   
> It's a complicated fascinating little known bit of
> history. I'll add that all the breakaway states
> are very interesting to visit as a tourist. Each
> has a unique character. With the exception of
> Ossetia all are easy to visit with Transistria and
> Artsakh being the easiest, Akhhazia is probably
> best visited in a group as it has a bit of a wild
> west atmosphere. 
> Two Transnistria and Abkhazia can be reached by
> train.
> No one takes you there better
> than http://www.youngpioneertours.com/internation
> al-tours/unrecognized-countries/ .


Great info, thanks. Visiting the "breakaway" republics is on my bucket list. Experiencing how easy it was to visit Russia (No organized tour necessary. I booked my own travel & stays, including Volgograd/Stalingrad), I'm encouraged. Which have you visited? The YP tours look interesting and are probably a good way to visit these nations.

If people like to ride trains & trams, go, just do it.  Also, tasty food throughout the region. Lots of Georgian restaurants in Russia.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/19/19 10:17 by Duna.



Date: 01/20/19 11:18
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: inCHI

Thanks for the interesting photos and descriptions.



Date: 01/20/19 15:58
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: gobbl3gook

Duna -- GettingShort has been many places.  

Seatch for his handle on "Static Photography"  His posts were part of the motivation for me to get out and see central Asia.  
https://www.trainorders.com/images2/index.php?start=104&category=0&search=gettingshort&author=on&title=&description=

For instance: 
North Korea
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,3555325

Croatia
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?17,3596032

Transnistria (breakaway region of Moldova) 
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,3594140

Abkhazia (breakaway region of Georgia) 
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?17,4043144

Eritrean steam
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,4043189

Georgia (posted on the European board)
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?17,4107043

Russia (Moscow to the south) 
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?17,4638983

Myanmar to London, highlights
https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,3486679

Thanks for your information, photos and inspiration, GettingShort.  I think the thread that really got me thinking about doing international train travel myself was your adventuring in Myanmar posts from 2014.  https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?6,3432302  
There were other factors, too, of course, but reading your posts about ho-hum ticket buying, boarding, and rolling across the countryside in old, open air train sets got me thinking "I really need to quit riding Amtrak and get out and see the world!"  

In 2014 I had only flown over across an ocean twice in my life, both times to Hong Kong.  Since then I've done four major overseas bicycle-train journeys -- Germany and the Alps in 2015, Thaliand in 2016, Scandinavia and Eastern Europe, 2016, and Central Asia to Eastern Europe, 2017. 

For those of you that have an interest in doing this kind of travel, get out there and see it!  It's very inexpensive, reasonably easy once you get there, most places have pretty much zero theft problems or other personal crime. 

My expenses for 9 weeks of travel, lodging, visas was $1200.  That was for
* 40 nights in hotels and hostels,
* 5000 km of train travel (with sleeper bunks),
* 2 ferry runs of 48 hours each (with meals included and bunks in a shared cabin), and
* a tourist visa to Azerbaijan.  

Ted in OR



Date: 01/22/19 07:25
Re: Georgia, part 8, Batumi rail yards
Author: pennengineer

gobbl3gook Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> pennengineer -- are you the same pennengineer that
> went to Kazakhstan in
> 2008?  https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/re
> ad.php?6,1707920,1707928#1707928  I enjoyed
> reading your post.  (Though I didn't read it
> until after I came back from my trip).  Did you
> go to Georgia in 2008 also?  
>

Yes, that's me. I've been to Kazakhstan three times now, Georgia twice (the first time travelling by train from Germany via Turkey), Azerbaijan and Armenia once each, Russia several (5?) times including the Trans-Siberian...the list goes on!



Pages:  [ 1 ][ 2 ] [ Next ]
Current Page:1 of 2


[ Share Thread on Facebook ] [ Search ] [ Start a New Thread ] [ Back to Thread List ] [ <Newer ] [ Older> ] 
Page created in 0.2482 seconds