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International Railroad Discussion > Downunder Images - The Rest of June


Date: 07/15/22 05:15
Downunder Images - The Rest of June
Author: AussieGWAdriver

Hi all,

Some images from the rest of June and all were taken in South Australia unless noted.

1-3. Rail First owned MP33C, CM3308 on lease to Bowmans Rail hauls two AVDP class relay/ brake vans through Nairne as train 2122S on 6/21/22. The two carriages were in private ownership at Tailem Bend and had been sold to Rail First for conversion into crew vans.
 








Date: 07/15/22 05:20
Re: Downunder Images - The Rest of June
Author: AussieGWAdriver

Next lot.

1 & 2. 4AD1 with GWA003 and GWA002 waits at Kultanaby as the first light of the day appears on 6/23/22.

3. The sun has just risen as 4DA2 with CLP14, ALF21 and GWB103 passes through Kingoonya on 6/23/22.








Date: 07/15/22 05:22
Re: Downunder Images - The Rest of June
Author: AussieGWAdriver

Next lot.

1 & 2. 4AD1 and 4DA2 cross at Kingoonya, 6/23/22.

3. 4AD1 with GWA003 and GWA002 wait on the siding at Katherine in the Northern Territory on 6/24/22.








Date: 07/15/22 05:26
Re: Downunder Images - The Rest of June
Author: AussieGWAdriver

Next lot.

1. Pacific National service 7SP3 with NR38 and NR98 passes through Tarcoola on 6/26/22.

2. Empty ore train 1901S to Rankin Dam approaces Kultanaby with GWU012 and GWA007 on 6/26/22.

3. Another empty ore train this times 6911S to Wirrida with GWB102 and GWA009 on the front with DPU units GWA010 and GWB101 on the rear approaches Coondambo on 6/26/22.








Date: 07/15/22 05:27
Re: Downunder Images - The Rest of June
Author: AussieGWAdriver

Last one.

The trail end of 6911's DPU units roll past 7DA2 with GWA002 and GWA003 at Coondambo on 6/26/22.

Enjoy.
Justin




Date: 07/15/22 14:02
Re: Downunder Images - The Rest of June
Author: norm1153

Thank you for posting this series.  I wonder what is in the white container that is in the first picture's locomotive.  Perhaps coffee or water? 



Date: 07/15/22 22:34
Re: Downunder Images - The Rest of June
Author: Ritzville

Very NICE series!

Larry



Date: 07/16/22 09:30
Re: Downunder Images - The Rest of June
Author: pedrop

Very nice to see more about australian trains. It's a pity we do not have TO fellows in the Pilbara area to keep us updated about the trains there. The same happens here with the railroads far from the South and Southeast areas.

Posted from Android

Pedro Rezende
Vespasiano, MG
https://youtube.com/c/minasgeraisrailways1



Date: 07/16/22 23:09
Re: Downunder Images - The Rest of June
Author: joemagruder

How are the crew vans used?



Date: 07/21/22 05:53
Re: Downunder Images - The Rest of June
Author: AussieGWAdriver

Thanks everyone.

The white container in the first picture is the 240 volt kettle to boil water for coffee / tea etc and is pretty much standard in any Australian locomotive.

The Pilbara regoin is an expensive place to go just for railfanning, even for Australians. I would love to go there one day but for nearly the same amount of money I could take the family on a holiday out of Australia to somewhere in the Pacific like Fiji.

Crew vans are used for relay working in remote areas where there are little to no towns or crew depots. Pacific National, One Rail Australia and SCT use them. For the company I work for and SCT, the crews work 8 hours driving then 8 hours resting. A crew is two people, so four drivers/ 2nd persons would be rostered. The company I work for has a 54 hour limit for this type of working and it allows us to do the 3000km (1860 mile) trip from Adelaide to Darwin. There we get off the train and have minimum of 12 hours of before getting on the train to do the return journey. It means we are away for nearly 6 days. Our company uses it for grain trains from South Australia into Victoria also which means only 4 drivers are neaded for the 24-32 hour turn around of the train.

Justin



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