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Western Railroad Discussion > Narrow gauge car width


Date: 02/15/03 16:27
Narrow gauge car width
Author: webmaster

What is the width of a narrow gauge passenger car, and what is the width of a standard gauage passenger car?

Todd



Date: 02/15/03 18:18
Re: Narrow gauge car width
Author: MTMEngineer

How narrow???

A standard gauge (56 1/2") car is 10' 0", 2.12 times gauge.

Colorado narrow gauge (36") cars ran about 8' 6", 2.83 times gauge, while Milwaukee Roads narrow gauge equipment ran closer to 8' 3".

Maine 2' gauge cars were very narrow, about 6' 5", but that is 3.2 times gauge!



Date: 02/15/03 18:25
Re: Narrow gauge car width
Author: run8

MTMEngineer wrote:

> A standard gauge (56 1/2") car is 10' 0", 2.12 times gauge.
>
> Colorado narrow gauge (36") cars ran about 8' 6",

... and as clarification, those measurements are over the carbody. You have to add a few inches for the handrails.

Some newer cars, like Amtrak's Horizon cars, are a few inches wider, since they bulge out above the floor level to give increased hip and shoulder room above raised platforms.



Date: 02/16/03 14:45
Re: Narrow gauge car width
Author: ge13031

Last time I stood on the platform of a Maine 2 footer I could wrap my hands around the corner posts ... right around 6 ft + 2 or 3 inches, wanted to take it home with me <G>



Date: 02/16/03 16:07
Re: Narrow gauge car width
Author: railbaron

This could be a trick question (I know it's not but it could be). Why?

To be a "trick question", one would have to allow for 42" gauge to be considered "narrow gauge". If you allow for that, how about the same as a standard width car. In fact, how about a standard gauge car itself.

Yes, on the Canadian National lines in Newfoundland they would load standard gauge cars onto the ferry at North Sydney and ship them to Port aux Basques. The cars would be rolled off, raised up, and the standard gauge trucks would be swapped with "narrow gauge" trucks for the trip on the island. Unfortunately these lines were abandoned a number of years ago but it was neat to see.



Date: 02/16/03 16:21
Re: Narrow gauge car width
Author: MTMEngineer

railbaron wrote:

> This could be a trick question (I know it's not but it could
> be). Why?
>
> To be a "trick question", one would have to allow for 42"
> gauge to be considered "narrow gauge". If you allow for that,
> how about the same as a standard width car. In fact, how about
> a standard gauge car itself.
>
> Yes, on the Canadian National lines in Newfoundland they
> would load standard gauge cars onto the ferry at North Sydney
> and ship them to Port aux Basques. The cars would be rolled
> off, raised up, and the standard gauge trucks would be swapped
> with "narrow gauge" trucks for the trip on the island.
> Unfortunately these lines were abandoned a number of years ago
> but it was neat to see.
>

Of course 42" is narrow gauge! Anything less than 56 1/2" is narrow gauge. (Of course, by that definition, I think the Northeast Corridor is narrow gauge. IIRC, it's 56 3/8".)

EBT did the same thing with standard gauge freight cars on 36" gauge track.

But we know it's not a trick question, 'cause Todd carefully inquired specifically about passenger equipment. <g>



Date: 02/16/03 21:24
Re: Narrow gauge car width
Author: railbaron

Well, technically the CN did have a rider coach on the rear of the freight trains (they were mixed trains when they ran). However, I don't remeber if the coach was the same width as the box cars or if it was narrower.



Date: 02/16/03 23:58
Re: Narrow gauge car width
Author: TopcoatSmith

In pictures I've seen of The Newfie NG the passenger equipment was considerably narrower than standard guage cars. I wish it were still there, I know bits of it survive on display around the province.


TCS



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