Home Open Account Help 270 users online

Western Railroad Discussion > ISO/ASA 80 too slow.


Date: 02/14/20 08:01
ISO/ASA 80 too slow.
Author: lilwes

I received a Mamiya RB67 2 weeks ago and started to use it last week.  For those of you who do not know what an RB67 is I have included a photo of this beast.  It weights in at 8.25 pounds with the eye level view finder and takes 2.25x2.75 negatives.  These photo's were taken east of Grantville, KS. using Ilford Ortho + film.  This film is rated at ISO 80.  I have found out that is way to slow for action shots so it's off to someones ISO 400 film.  I do love using this camera and look forward to many hours of fun the summer with it.  If anyone has advice on going back to film for railfanning I would love for you to PM me.
Thanks for looking, Wes

Wes Chiles
Topeka, KS



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/14/20 12:14 by lilwes.








Date: 02/14/20 08:01
Re: ISO/ASA 80 to slow.
Author: lilwes

.

Wes Chiles
Topeka, KS








Date: 02/14/20 09:46
Re: ISO/ASA 80 to slow.
Author: Railpax71

RB67 has a nice heft and you will not have problems with camera shake with the leaf shutter! However, you will probably max out the highest shutter speed on the lens 1/400? before you exhaust the exposure possibilities of ASA 80 film. f5.6-8 at 1/400 sunny 16 and motion blur. You also have the depth of field scale for aperture settings on the Mamiya lens which moderns auto everything lens do not.



Date: 02/14/20 09:51
Re: ISO/ASA 80 to slow.
Author: seod

I used Kodachrome 25 for many years for action and I got pretty good results. You just have to understand its limitations. I shot at 1/500 at F4 and it worked most of the time. ISO 80 is about 1 1/2 stops faster so you should be able to shoot at 1/1000 at about F5. I do not know how fast the lenses you use are but some of the medium format glass is a bit slower than 35mm. My slowest lens was my 300 F4 everything else was F2.8 or faster. You really needed the faster glass when using KM25. I will say when I went digi that I started using F stops abd shutter speeds I never thought I would be able to use. I miss film but I do not miss the expense of film.

What exposure were you shooting at?.

Scott O'Dell



Date: 02/14/20 11:48
Re: ISO/ASA 80 to slow.
Author: lilwes

Here's the photo I forgot to post.  And yes you need to plan ahead with it.
Wes

Wes Chiles
Topeka, KS




Date: 02/14/20 12:59
Re: ISO/ASA 80 to slow.
Author: Plainsman

One thing I would do for sure when shooting b&w is pick up a couple of grades of yellow filters to deepen skys and bring out cloud/sky contrast.



Date: 02/14/20 14:09
Re: ISO/ASA 80 to slow.
Author: tehachcond

Plainsman Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> One thing I would do for sure when shooting b&w is
> pick up a couple of grades of yellow filters to
> deepen skys and bring out cloud/sky contrast.

   If I remember from my film days, a yellow K2 filter had a filter factor of 2, which meant that the filter would cut the light going to the lens in half, or one full F stop.  If you atre using editing software on your negatives, you can shoot without the filter and simulate the filter effect with the software.
   If you are using the old chemical and tray method, a K2 will work with at least ASA 400 film...and I know I'm going to start a debate here... I would recommend a good panchromatic film rather than ortho.  As a note, I was a professional photographer before I hired out in train service with the Southern Pacific in 1966.
   Hope this helps.

Brian Black
Castle Rock, CO



Date: 02/14/20 16:21
Re: ISO/ASA 80 to slow.
Author: robj

I don't like the idea of going to 400 film for just general daylight photograph.  If you are scanning negatives there should be plenty of leeway to shoot ASA80.  However, it is hard to compare to old days as our criterion as to what is sharp has changed.  The 400 film would be suitable for low light. 

Certainly picking subjects and locations can alleviate the problem greatly.    I'd also note in my opinion  that format is not the best for out in the flatlands  photos. 

Bob



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/14/20 16:21 by robj.



Date: 02/15/20 22:53
Re: ISO/ASA 80 to slow.
Author: Plainsman

tehachcond Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Plainsman Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > One thing I would do for sure when shooting b&w
> is
> > pick up a couple of grades of yellow filters to
> > deepen skys and bring out cloud/sky contrast.
>
>    If I remember from my film days, a yellow K2
> filter had a filter factor of 2, which meant that
> the filter would cut the light going to the lens
> in half, or one full F stop.  If you atre using
> editing software on your negatives, you can shoot
> without the filter and simulate the filter effect
> with the software.
>    If you are using the old chemical and tray
> method, a K2 will work with at least ASA 400
> film...and I know I'm going to start a debate
> here... I would recommend a good panchromatic film
> rather than ortho.  As a note, I was a
> professional photographer before I hired out in
> train service with the Southern Pacific in 1966.
>    Hope this helps.
>
> Brian Black
> Castle Rock, CO

While grain size in 400 speed film would be an issue to consider in 35mm, it will be quite a bit less evident in a considerably bigger negative - unless of course you're trying to be the Ansel Adams of train photography.



[ Share Thread on Facebook ] [ Search ] [ Start a New Thread ] [ Back to Thread List ] [ <Newer ] [ Older> ] 
Page created in 0.0681 seconds