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Western Railroad Discussion > What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?


Date: 06/28/20 06:42
What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: dtoeppen

What does SS stand for in signal place names?

East end of a siding is typically named ESS <placename>, ie ESS Springer. West end is named WSS <placename>, ie WSS Springer.

It's pretty obvious what the E and W stand for. But what does the SS mean?

I'm pretty sure it's not:
* Stainless Steel
* The kind of SS they had in Hogan's Heroes

Maybe it's as simple as "Side Siding", ie West Side Siding Springer? But that seems too alliterative.

Curious minds await your reply.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 06/28/20 06:51 by dtoeppen.



Date: 06/28/20 06:44
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: goneon66

SS = "Siding Switch"

so, WSS Springer is "West Siding Switch" Springer............

66



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/28/20 06:48 by goneon66.



Date: 06/28/20 06:51
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: Super_C

And prior to the "ESS" and "WSS"  nomenclature, there were signs that merely said "SS" for spring switch.



Date: 06/28/20 06:58
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: dtoeppen

Thanks for the info. Now I can stop making up stuff in my head every time I see one of the signs.

 



Date: 06/28/20 08:10
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: MP683

In TWC, you’d have North/South/East/West Siding switch as mentioned above.

SS on a switch stand would be a spring switch Designation which can be found on any type of territory.



Date: 06/28/20 08:32
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: DivergingClear

Another fun fact, a spring switch (not SS, as we just established) on BNSF is designated by a sign with a single (S).



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/28/20 08:35 by DivergingClear.



Date: 06/28/20 11:58
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: philhoov

It stands for SuperSport and it's for trains with lots of horsepower :)
Phil



Date: 06/28/20 12:09
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: tomstp

Spring switch and has been that since around the 1920's etc.  Widley use on the Texas & Pacific passing tracks. Picture show example of them and in this car two of them.




Date: 06/28/20 13:07
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: The-late-EMD

Spring switch is the correct answer

Posted from iPhone



Date: 06/28/20 13:21
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: RSD5

And the first time you see a train rolling down the siding about to enter the main with a switch clearly lined for the main.   Definately a moment to give you the jitters.

Dave



Date: 06/28/20 14:47
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: KskidinTx

Let's analyze just what the OP is asking.  First of all the title designates only the ATSF, not other railroads.  Secondly, his first question refers to "signal place names"Nothing to do with what type of switch it is.

goneon66, the first responder, gave the correct answer, such as "West Siding Switch Springer".  These signs were put up to designate a particular location in order to give train authority, etc. so there would be no question as to where it applied.

dtoeppen Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> What does SS stand for in signal place names?
>
> East end of a siding is typically named ESS , ie
> ESS Springer. West end is named WSS , ie WSS
> Springer.
>
> It's pretty obvious what the E and W stand for.
> But what does the SS mean?
>
> I'm pretty sure it's not:
> * Stainless Steel
> * The kind of SS they had in Hogan's Heroes
>
> Maybe it's as simple as "Side Siding", ie West
> Side Siding Springer? But that seems too
> alliterative.
>
> Curious minds await your reply

As far as designations for spring switches, ATSF used to use a singular "S" mounted on the switch frame  As the posted picture indicates, the MOP did it differently.

Mark



Date: 06/28/20 15:49
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: John

Was there not an FRA requirement some time ago that required each end of sidings to be uniquely defined, so that Serra siding had to have an East Serra location and an West Serra location for the ends of the siding in CTC territory?  Alternatively, you could give the two ends of the siding completely different names:  Jones (east switch) and Miller (west switch).  The same requirement extended to non-CTC territory.  At least that is what I recall.



Date: 06/28/20 15:57
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: 4thDistrict

KskidinTx Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Let's analyze just what the OP is asking.

Thanks! Always nice to hear from people who actually read the questions AND know enough about the topic to answer with useful information.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 06/28/20 16:00 by 4thDistrict.



Date: 06/28/20 17:27
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: KskidinTx

John Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Was there not an FRA requirement some time ago
> that required each end of sidings to be uniquely
> defined, so that Serra siding had to have an East
> Serra location and an West Serra location for the
> ends of the siding in CTC territory?
>  Alternatively, you could give the two ends of
> the siding completely different names:  Jones
> (east switch) and Miller (west switch).  The same
> requirement extended to non-CTC territory.  At
> least that is what I recall.

I personally am not aware of any FRA requirement but I've been gone for years.  What you wrote makes good sense to me.  Anything to prevent an accident!.

Mark



Date: 06/28/20 21:10
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: BNSF6400

Both the BNSF and UP have plenty of sidings with just one name still, so I doubt there is an FRA rule.  Some entities, like Amtrak and Metrolink, have chose to use a different name for each control point.  On the Union Pacific, from what I can tell, they simply use the Control Point identifier (CPAL550 for example) if clarity is needed.  That being said, the line the OP referenced, the BNSF from Alburqueque to La Junta, the timetable just list the individual siding names but in the field they are seperate "West Raton" and "East Raton" signs for each location.

John Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Was there not an FRA requirement some time ago
> that required each end of sidings to be uniquely
> defined, so that Serra siding had to have an East
> Serra location and an West Serra location for the
> ends of the siding in CTC territory?
>  Alternatively, you could give the two ends of
> the siding completely different names:  Jones
> (east switch) and Miller (west switch).  The same
> requirement extended to non-CTC territory.  At
> least that is what I recall.



Date: 06/28/20 21:19
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: goneon66

to my knowledge, the ess/wss/nss/sss designations are for track warrant control territories.

i have not seen those designations in ctc territories............

66



Date: 06/29/20 00:19
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: Evan_Werkema

For what it's worth, those ESS/WSS signs were not Santa Fe legacy, but appeared after the BNSF merger.  Santa Fe practice up to the merger was to place one of their standard station signs near the middle of the siding (usually where the depot had been if there ever was one), and that was it. 



Date: 06/29/20 10:39
Re: What does SS stand for in ATSF signal place names?
Author: MyfordBrowning

There is a reqirement that all control point have an identification. I am not sure if it a FRAregulation, but it well could be. The Santa Fe normally has a station name for passing tracks in single track areas with the ends called East control signal or west control signal. Metrolink and the Coaster have each control point with a different name, even each end of a passing track.



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