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Steam & Excursion > This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is Odd!


Date: 05/17/20 03:26
This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is Odd!
Author: LoggerHogger

The first photo of Southern Pacific's 4-6-0 #2315 at Bayshore, California in February, 1953 raises some questions.  Was she undergoing repairs and then the decision was made to scrap her instead?  If she was going to be scrapped, why is she parked where she is at the Bayshore roundhouse?

I have included an earlier shot of her taken in March, 1952 just to show what all has been removed in the 1953 view.  Since we know that #2315 was stricken from the SP roster in January, 1953 and scrapped the next month, we know that the scrapping has clearly begun in the first photo.  She appears to have another locomotive, sans tender, backed up behind her awaiting the same fate.  Have they really chosen this spot over the drop pit to cut her up and have her pieces fall into the pit below?

Many questions raised with this photo.

Martin



Edited 6 time(s). Last edit at 05/17/20 03:45 by LoggerHogger.






Date: 05/17/20 04:51
Re: This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is
Author: KMiddlebrook

The straight cuts provide the appearance of surgery rather than scrapping.  
Is it possible her cylinders and or saddle were needed for another locomotive?  Searching though maintenance records of similar locomotives may provide a clue.  
After such radical surgery with the cutting of her frames, scrapping was likely the eventual outcome.  

Another interesting question, WHY was she selected to become a donor locomotive?

Neat image.  



Date: 05/17/20 07:04
Re: This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is
Author: Frisco1522

That sounds plausible, but I wonder why the smokebox front has been cut also?  Maybe it was done elsewhere and the body dumped here.  Strange indeed.



Date: 05/17/20 08:49
Re: This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is
Author: Southern-Pacific-fan

Looks like she is pretty close to the rail end, and is missing the front drivers also. if  the pilpt truck was still attached it would be off the end. Funny they would leave her balanced like that



Date: 05/17/20 08:52
Re: This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is
Author: czuleget

My guess is the smoke box cover was left on to stabilize the removed lower portion, while transporting and to allow a good fit up to the recipient engine.   



Date: 05/17/20 12:37
Re: This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is
Author: Frisco1522

Good point about keeping the smokebox from collapsing or something. 



Date: 05/17/20 13:58
Re: This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is
Author: PHall

Frisco1522 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> That sounds plausible, but I wonder why the
> smokebox front has been cut also?  Maybe it was
> done elsewhere and the body dumped here.  Strange
> indeed.

To make room so it would be easier to get the cylinders out?



Date: 05/17/20 16:35
Re: This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is
Author: TonyJ

It was done to increase the draft!



Date: 05/18/20 07:38
Re: This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is
Author: LocoPilot750

I want the whistle.

Posted from Android



Date: 05/18/20 09:51
Re: This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is
Author: wingomann

KMiddlebrook Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The straight cuts provide the appearance of
> surgery rather than scrapping.  
> Is it possible her cylinders and or saddle were
> needed for another locomotive?  Searching though
> maintenance records of similar locomotives may
> provide a clue.  
> After such radical surgery with the cutting of her
> frames, scrapping was likely the eventual outcome.

It also seems weird that by 1953 they would be salvaging cylinders and saddle from one engine to repair another.  Seems like that level of repair would make the other loco a scrap candidate too.



Date: 05/18/20 12:44
Re: This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is
Author: PHall

wingomann Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> KMiddlebrook Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > The straight cuts provide the appearance of
> > surgery rather than scrapping.  
> > Is it possible her cylinders and or saddle were
> > needed for another locomotive?  Searching
> though
> > maintenance records of similar locomotives may
> > provide a clue.  
> > After such radical surgery with the cutting of
> her
> > frames, scrapping was likely the eventual
> outcome.
>
> It also seems weird that by 1953 they would be
> salvaging cylinders and saddle from one engine to
> repair another.  Seems like that level of repair
> would make the other loco a scrap candidate too.

An engine with a cracked cylinder assembly but with lot's of flue time left?



Date: 05/18/20 14:07
Re: This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is
Author: Chico43

wingomann Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> It also seems weird that by 1953 they would be
> salvaging cylinders and saddle from one engine to
> repair another.  Seems like that level of repair
> would make the other loco a scrap candidate too.

Agreed, especially when you consider that the engines in that class were no spring chickens by 1953.



Date: 05/19/20 19:12
Re: This Locomotive's Scrapping, The Method & Location Chosen Is
Author: drumwrencher

This is a garden pit, but not the drop pit. That was stall 38 in the roundhouse - still there, though filled with dirt.
I think both guesses are right. Usually scrapped from the top down, she’s been butchered for parts. Most likely cut out in the backshop for “transplant surgery”, then this “donor” was slowly eased over to the garden for final scrapping.
Quick edit: perhaps the butchering happened here, but it would have been more difficult to transport the saddle from here. Would have required dropping a flat car a stall over, and use of a crane from there out. Not impossible, but surley more work than worth.
Posted from iPhone



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/19/20 19:23 by drumwrencher.



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