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Date: 05/22/20 17:44
Daylight vs Yamato
Author: OKTrainboys

Just for fun, here is a 1:200 Yamato with a 1:160 Daylight. So, scale wise, the Daylight is just a bit too big here. My son has a kickass mancave! LOL






Date: 05/22/20 18:07
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: TCnR

Interesting perspective, I've been watching videos about the sea battles in the Pacific during WWII. No doubt about it, that's one big-ass battleship.

Actually there were two of them. Battlefield from BBC.

+  For those interested:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_battleship_Yamato



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/22/20 19:54 by TCnR.



Date: 05/22/20 18:32
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: TheNavigator

TCnR Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> Actually there were two of them. Battlefield from BBC.

Two battleships completed, 3 hulls constructed, the 3rd hull converted to an aircraft carrier.  Both battleships sunk by carrier-based aircraft and the carrier conversion was sunk by a submarine, IIRC.

Two nice models, btw.

GK



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/22/20 19:23 by TheNavigator.



Date: 05/22/20 18:49
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: perklocal

Way Cool !



Date: 05/22/20 19:45
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: JDLX

There were to have been four Yamato class ships, two authorized in 1936 and two more in 1939. Specifications called for ships with nine 18.1 inch guns, capable of withstanding 18 inch shellfire and 660-lb warhead torpedos, top speed 27 knots, and cruising range of 8,000 miles at 18 knots. Japanese naval strategy had always called for maintaining a fleet of 8 battleships and 8 battle cruisers under the theory that such a fleet could meet any potential adversary on equal or better terms. By the middle 1930s Japan recognized they simply could not compete numerically with British and US battleship construction so they went with superior quality. The Yamato and sister Musashi spent most of the war held in reserve; the Yamato became generally known as “Hotel Yamato” within the Imperial Japanese Navy. The Yamato fired at enemy warships exactly once, specifically the escort carriers, destroyers, and destroyer escorts of “Taffy 3” in Leyte Gulf. Musashi has been sunk by aircraft the day before the surface engagement, US forces recorded 19 torpedo and 17 bomb hits, plus 18 near misses, while the Japanese reported 11 torpedos, 10 bombs, and 6 near misses. Carrier aircraft got the Yamato in April 1945; the US pilots concentrated their fire on one side of the ship, recording 11-13 torpedo and at least 8 bomb hits. The ship broke in two while sinking.

Japanese shipyards laid down the other two ships around 1940. The Shinano had been completed up to the main deck at the time of the Midway battle, at which time they elected to convert it to a carrier. In the end they could only accommodate one hangar deck and as such the IJN saw it as a support carrier where planes operating from less armored carriers in rear areas could be landed for refueling and rearming. IJN commissioned the ship on 18 November 1944, ten days later a US submarine put four torpedos into it. The ship was incomplete and had a very inexperienced crew, both factors allowed the flooding to go unchecked and the ship capsized. It was the largest carrier built during the war and the US Navy discredited the claims of the sub captain until records obtained after the war finally validated what he’d reported seeing in his periscope. The IJN abandoned building the fourth ship when it was about 30% complete.

Great photos, thanks for the comparison!

Jeff Moore
Elko, NV

Posted from iPhone



Date: 05/22/20 19:47
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: Bob3985

Oh no, they stole the daylight. Hahaha.

Bob Krieger
Cheyenne, WY



Date: 05/22/20 22:07
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: garrett

"This just in: American navy knocks the daylight out of the Yamato.  Pictures at eleven."



Date: 05/23/20 00:05
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: clem

As a bonus, you got a digital picture of an atomic clock. Useful if you ever want to know how far off you camera clock was.



Date: 05/23/20 10:43
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: march_hare

And for really weird scale, here is a 1:87 Daylight with some big, lumbering thing in the background. 




Date: 05/23/20 11:06
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: wcamp1472

The white tires make ALL the difference ..
To the young people in our audience, up close to steam...it's what makes the
engine's size really impressive ...   That's why you expend the effort.

On the 12" to-the-foot model, keeping them clean is easy....
at the end of the day, just hit them with a thin fuel-oil ( kerosene is good)
and either wipe or wash them off...

Get your volunteers & picture-takers involved, like Tom Sawyer did...
Dont give me this hog-wash that it's too hard to keep them clean..
Not everything I taught Doyle stuck...
(He DID keep the good stuff, like insistence on safety).

W..


 



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/23/20 11:28 by wcamp1472.



Date: 05/23/20 11:54
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: Chico43

Appearance maintanance notwithstanding, white wheel tires on locomotives are a little too "Disneyland" for my tastes. But that's just my opinion.



Date: 05/23/20 12:37
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: heatermason

So if my math is right, the Daylight is 25% too large.  Making that mental adjustment makes the Yamato all the more impressive; I've been next to the Daylight.

A.C. Gilbert took the "whitewalls" off their American Flyer electric train locomotives to save resources, too Wes.  Doesn't look "right" to me either, but it's running!

Timothy



Date: 05/23/20 12:54
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: Topfuel

wcamp1472 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The white tires make ALL the difference ..
>

As always, to each their own.  I think white tires look horrible on a steam engine. There's no comparison to how bitchin the 4449 looks in this photo with no white-walls, compared to the "circus train/movie loco/Disneyland" look of an engine with white driver tires.  But I would imagine opinions are about evenly divided on this issue.



Date: 05/23/20 13:06
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: masterphots

heatermason Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> So if my math is right, the Daylight is 25% too
> large.  Making that mental adjustment makes the
> Yamato all the more impressive; I've been next to
> the Daylight.
>
> A.C. Gilbert took the "whitewalls" off their
> American Flyer electric train locomotives to save
> resources, too Wes.  Doesn't look "right" to me
> either, but it's running!
>
> Timothy

Having probably seen every Daylight 4-8-4 go by my house when I was a kid,  I can't recall ever seeing one with white tires.



Date: 05/23/20 15:22
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: HotWater

masterphots Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> heatermason Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > So if my math is right, the Daylight is 25% too
> > large.  Making that mental adjustment makes
> the
> > Yamato all the more impressive; I've been next
> to
> > the Daylight.
> >
> > A.C. Gilbert took the "whitewalls" off their
> > American Flyer electric train locomotives to
> save
> > resources, too Wes.  Doesn't look "right" to
> me
> > either, but it's running!
> >
> > Timothy
>
> Having probably seen every Daylight 4-8-4 go by my
> house when I was a kid,  I can't recall ever
> seeing one with white tires.

Thank you Alan!!!!!

I've never liked white tires, even though as a modeler, I modeled mostly C&O, and their big freight power had white tires, go figure. I didn't like it, but learned to live with it, with proper weathering of course.  SP Daylights, cab forwards, P class Pacifics, and MT class Mountains did NOT have white tires in service.



Date: 05/23/20 16:13
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: wcamp1472

Well, 

THEY aren't.  "in service",  NOW!
Haven't been in service for almost 50 years..
And that Railroad no longer exists...

However, those that do the work, get to do the paint ...
The rest is a reflection of style ..., or lack...

W...



Date: 05/23/20 16:20
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: HotWater

wcamp1472 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Well, 
>
> THEY aren't.  "in service",  NOW!
> Haven't been in service for almost 50 years..
> And that Railroad no longer exists...
>
> However, those that do the work, get to do the
> paint ...
> The rest is a reflection of style ..., or lack...
>
> ​W...

Wes,

Please,,,,,,,,,,4449 looks a LOT better now without those white tires! She isn't in Freedom Train service anymore, and the SP did NOT have white tires on their steam power. Also note that 4449 is now painted & lettered back to her "as delivered" styling of 1941, i.e. NO WHITE TIRES!



Date: 05/23/20 16:50
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: heatermason

Masterphots, I can respect that to you the archetypal Daylights you saw as a boy had no white tires!

The first one I saw was as a teen, it was painted red, white and blue, and it had white tires.  Before that the Daylights existed to me only as black and white and in photos only.

Truly to each his own, and I love it no less with black tires.  In truth when I get my own new tires for my rigs, my tire guy asks me whether I want the white in or out and I flip a coin.  But those white tires do draw the eye.  And imprinted in my memory is 4449 going by 6' away from me at 79 mph or so while I hung on to an SP signal for dear life.  The tires were white.

Thanks for sharing!  I'm jealous.  Wish I had a lot more of those memories.

Timothy



Date: 05/23/20 19:39
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: PHall

Looking through the various Daylight books that I have it appears that locomotives were delivered from Lima with white paint on the driver tires and the tender wheels.
And that it didn't last more then a couple of months. Probably painted over when touch up paint was needed.



Date: 05/23/20 20:47
Re: Daylight vs Yamato
Author: ORNHOO

JDLX Wrote:
>
> Japanese shipyards laid down the other two ships
> around 1940. The Shinano had been completed up to
> the main deck at the time of the Midway battle, at
> which time they elected to convert it to a
> carrier. In the end they could only accommodate
> one hangar deck and as such the IJN saw it as a
> support carrier where planes operating from less
> armored carriers in rear areas could be landed for
> refueling and rearming. IJN commissioned the ship
> on 18 November 1944, ten days later a US submarine
> put four torpedos into it. The ship was
> incomplete and had a very inexperienced crew, both
> factors allowed the flooding to go unchecked and
> the ship capsized. It was the largest carrier
> built during the war and the US Navy discredited
> the claims of the sub captain until records
> obtained after the war finally validated what
> he’d reported seeing in his periscope. The IJN
> abandoned building the fourth ship when it was
> about 30% complete.
>
> Great photos, thanks for the comparison!
>
> Jeff Moore
> Elko, NV
>
> Posted from iPhone

The submarine that sank the Sinano was the U.S.S. Archerfish (SS-311), under the command of Commander Joseph Enright. Enright deliberately ordered his torpedoes set to run at a shallower than normal depth, theorizing that it would cause flooding higher in the hull causing the ship to become unbalanced and capsize. The Shinano had been equipped with anti-torpedo "blisters" along the sides of the hull. The shallow running torpedoes impacted above the top of the blisters exploding directly against the hull proper.



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