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European Railroad Discussion > This Week's A. E. Brown BR Steam


Date: 12/09/20 11:40
This Week's A. E. Brown BR Steam
Author: gbmott

Here's this week's selection
1.  BR 6000 King George V - Newbury 5-56
2.  BR 35022 Holland America Line - Basingstoke 4-4-56
3.  BR 42995 - Newbury Race Course 4-55

Gordon
 



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/09/20 17:02 by gbmott.








Date: 12/09/20 15:35
Re: This Week's A. E. Brown BR Steam
Author: railsmith

gbmott Wrote:
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> Here's this week's selection

> 2.  BR 35002 Holland America Line - Basingstoke

That's 35022.  Superb photo.

The locomotive is carrying the headboard of the "Royal Wessex" express, London Waterloo to Weymouth. Usual consist was 13 coaches, six of which would be detached/added at Bournemouth West, including the kitchen-buffet car and restaurant car. At Wareham, two coaches for Swanage would be detached/added, and the remaining five would continue to Weymouth.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/09/20 15:45 by railsmith.



Date: 12/09/20 17:02
Re: This Week's A. E. Brown BR Steam
Author: gbmott

Thanks for the correction,  I've changed the original.

Gordon



Date: 12/10/20 04:04
Re: This Week's A. E. Brown BR Steam
Author: 86235

Thanks once again, I don't think no.3 is Newbury, upper quadrant semaphores and the train itself suggests somewhere on the former LMS.



Date: 12/10/20 06:38
Re: This Week's A. E. Brown BR Steam
Author: gbmott

86235 Wrote:
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> Thanks once again, I don't think no.3 is Newbury,
> upper quadrant semaphores and the train itself
> suggests somewhere on the former LMS.

I checked and this is the data I have.  There is an almost identical photo of 45583 with the same citation.  I have no way of confirming any of this and am likewise not familiar enough to be able to identify pre-nationalization signal systems, but certainly in the US that is usually a reliable identifying feature, so I'm happy to accept your suggestion.  There are only a few other shots of LMS locomotives and they are labeled as Camden, Shrewsbury, Oxford and Banbury.  Would that provide any clue to where this location might actually be?  Any and all suggestions welcome.

Gordon



Date: 12/10/20 09:37
Re: This Week's A. E. Brown BR Steam
Author: PHall

Interesting pilot truck on 6000. Leading axle has outboard bearings while the trailing axle has inboard bearings.



Date: 12/10/20 12:43
Re: This Week's A. E. Brown BR Steam
Author: 86235

gbmott Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I checked and this is the data I have.  There is
> an almost identical photo of 45583 with the same
> citation.  I have no way of confirming any of
> this and am likewise not familiar enough to be
> able to identify pre-nationalization signal
> systems, but certainly in the US that is usually a
> reliable identifying feature, so I'm happy to
> accept your suggestion.  There are only a few
> other shots of LMS locomotives and they are
> labeled as Camden, Shrewsbury, Oxford and Banbury.
>  Would that provide any clue to where this
> location might actually be?  Any and all
> suggestions welcome.
>
> Gordon

It might have been shot on the Oxford to Cambridge line which was ex-LNWR, the LMS in Banbury was only a backwater, not a double track mainline. Possibly between Shrewsbury and Crewe, another ex-LNWR line.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/11/20 01:30 by 86235.



Date: 12/10/20 17:11
Re: This Week's A. E. Brown BR Steam
Author: dwatry

Superb photos as usual.  To my eye ex-GWR steam (#1) always look a little unbalanced.  The cab and tender seem too small to match the front half of the loco. 



Date: 12/11/20 01:41
Re: This Week's A. E. Brown BR Steam
Author: 86235

PHall Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Interesting pilot truck on 6000. Leading axle has
> outboard bearings while the trailing axle has
> inboard bearings.

It was to do with the size of the inside cylinders and the position of the rocking shafts which operated the piston valves. The King's were built to the maximum size possible, dictated by the GWR's loading gauge and maximum permitted axle load. The King's predecessor class, the Castles, had four 16 inch x 26 inch cylinders, the Kings were 16.25 inch x 28 inch, the increased diameter and stroke necessitated the unusual leading truck.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/11/20 01:42 by 86235.



Date: 12/13/20 06:42
Re: This Week's A. E. Brown BR Steam
Author: cricketer8for9

Bournemouth West or Central for the attachment/detachment. West was a terminus, so might it have been that the Bournemouth West portion was detached at Central and went forward to West?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/14/20 12:11 by cricketer8for9.



Date: 12/13/20 23:09
Re: This Week's A. E. Brown BR Steam
Author: railsmith

cricketer8for9 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Bournemouth West or Central for the
> attach,ent/detachment. West was a terminus, so
> might it have been that the Bournemouth West
> portion was detached at Central and went forward
> to West?

Yes, quite so, I was sloppy in my description.

In the era of the photograph, the up train from Weymouth (with Swanage coaches attached) would run through Bournemouth Central and then back on to the already waiting section from Bournewouth West.



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