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European Railroad Discussion > Three Not Taken by Mr. Brown But In His Collection


Date: 02/02/21 17:11
Three Not Taken by Mr. Brown But In His Collection
Author: gbmott

The three photos this week were all taken in the US during visits by UK locomotives.  Missing, of course, is Flying Scotsman's visit in the early 70s.  I'm not sure if A. E. Brown was still active by then, though I did actually see it in Minneapolis where I was the Asst. Terminal Superintendent for BN at the time.

1.  GWR 6000 King George V - Baltimore, Maryland 1927.  Newly-built, it was sent to help commemorate the B&O Railroad's centenary.
2.  LMS 6220 Coronation (actually 6229 Duchess of Hamilton) - Thomas Viaduct (1835), near Halethorpe, Maryland 1939,   Was in the US visiting the World''s Fair
3.  Locomotive lineup in Baltimore, 1939.  All four classes are represented in preservation, though both steam representatives have lost their streamlining.

There's lots more of A. E. Brown's work in the U.K., back to it next week.

Gordon








Date: 02/02/21 18:56
Re: Three Not Taken by Mr. Brown But In His Collection
Author: DKay

Really enjoying your series Gordon.Always reminds me of that wonderful Ian Allen publication ,Steam Days.
Regards,dK



Date: 02/03/21 06:23
Re: Three Not Taken by Mr. Brown But In His Collection
Author: 86235

The shot of 6220 and the 1939 Coronation Scot stock on Thomas Viaduct is very famous. Sadly that train never ran "in anger" as the streamliners on both the LMS and LNER were victims of WW2.



Date: 02/03/21 07:04
Re: Three Not Taken by Mr. Brown But In His Collection
Author: 55002

Thanks for these. The US photos are amazing. chris uk



Date: 02/03/21 07:34
Re: Three Not Taken by Mr. Brown But In His Collection
Author: gbmott

A question for those of you more familiar with these locomotives than me.  The photo of 6000 shows an airpump mounted on the side of the smokebox -- do I correctly assume that this was done specifically for the visit to the US?  I'm not aware of the GWR ever using air (as opposed to vacuum) brakes, but is that correct?  Also, any idea of the meaning of the "28" above the nameplate?  Blowing up the original I see it is painted on a circular metal plate that is suspended from the handrail on the boiler.

Gordon



Date: 02/03/21 14:38
Re: Three Not Taken by Mr. Brown But In His Collection
Author: 86235

The air brake would have been fitted to King George V specifically for the visit to North America, the GWR used the Sanders-Bolitho vacuum brake.

At the B&O Centenary was there a cavalcade and would 28 have been KGV's position in the cavalcade, just a guess?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/03/21 14:47 by 86235.



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