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European Railroad Discussion > Some station pictures of German ICE-trains


Date: 09/13/21 12:05
Some station pictures of German ICE-trains
Author: petmew

My  sons aim for this trip was to travel in some German high-speed ICE-trains. He's better in recognizing them than I am.
In this trip we did ICE1, ICE2 (is about 0.5 ICE1, really), ICE3, ICE-T and ICE4. So I guess we're now only missing the new ICE3-Velaro. Well, always keep something to do on your list.

The first ICE3 we got between Utrecht and Frankfurt Flughafen. It was missing the second train-set it was scheduled to run with, but I had reserved our seats in the part that was running, so no problem.
Now, in the Netherlands the ICE3 is free to run about 100 mph between Amsterdam and Utrecht under ETCS level 2 signalling, but because of track and suspension interaction and padding in the schedule, they usually just run about 85 mph over here. In Germany however speeds are often higher. Between Duisburg and Düsseldorf was our first stretch of about 12 miles where the train ran about 125 mph. Being an eight car light weight train, with four motorcars, accelerating to that speed is done quickly by this EMU.
After Cologne (well, after Siegburg) the train is free to speed at 185 mph towards Frankfurt Flughafen Fernbahnhof.

In Frankfurt the DB-app warned us, that our train towards Kassel Wilhelmshöhe would not be able to stop at Frankfurt Flughafen. But the app suggested a train to Frankfurt main station, where we would still catch our train.
Well, as a matter of fact, we bought some sandwiches at Flughafen and missed our first alternative, but trains are not rare in Germany, so no panic.

Towards Kassel the train runs on 'normal' tracks, so speeds were relatively low, I guess about 100 mph max, often slower because of curves etc. Freight train interference would have been possible, because they were present, but in Germany the dispatchers do try to get freights in the siding before passenger trains and especially ICEs are on the bell.

1) Here we have an ICE2 (I think, although they look the same as the ICE1 locomotives) leaving Kassel Wilhemshöhe. This station was built on the first German north-south high-speed line, avoiding the old Kassel terminus.
https://cdn.trainorders.com/attachments/thumbs/1579000/1_613f907cb960e.jpg
In an ICE2 we headed to Nürnburg. The train was missing one train-set, but again, I reserved seats.
In Nuremberg we got our Covid tests, because in Bavaria that was needed to get into restaurant and hotel (my son received his second vaccination a couple of days earlier).

The German population is not concentrated in one or just a few cities, but every couple of dozens of miles you'll find a city more or less worthy of having an ICE stop. So in Germany they are still upgrading existing lines to 125 mph speed. And especially in eastern Germany new high speed lines are being built, making more speedy connections between parts of the country. Those new lines are for the 185 mph speeds. Because the old LZB signalling system is outdated and because everybody wants ETCS, especially the EU, those new lines are fitted with ETCS level 2, baseline 3.

2) Here's a ICE-T leaving Erfurt. T stands for tilting, so the train can take curves at a somewhat higher speeds on certain tracks. We were in one of those, too.
https://cdn.trainorders.com/attachments/thumbs/1579000/2_613f90863aa6a.jpg

Further towards Leipzig I had planned to take a new-ish ICE4. They come in two lengths. Some of the newer ICE-trains are no longer developed to run (over) 200 mph. As I wrote before, there are just too many stops to need only very high speed trains. Pretty high speed (140-150 mph) is fast enough, as long as you can quickly accelerate and brake.

3) Here's an ICE4 leaving Leipzig main station. If there are model railroaders reading, this one gives you a nice weathering suggestion...
https://cdn.trainorders.com/attachments/thumbs/1579000/3_613f908f713f5.jpg

Some old trains in Leipzig to follow...

(Edited '...newer ICE-trains are now longer...' into '...no longer...')



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/15/21 11:57 by petmew.








Date: 09/13/21 12:32
Re: Some station pictures of German ICE-trains
Author: petmew

Well, I don't want to bother you with too much text in this post...

In Leipzig there are some trains and locomotives on display. Of course there was a steam locomotive 52.80. Every "self-respecting" railway museum in Germany (and in the Netherlands) has one/some, so I passed on that one.

But here are some of the other trains:
4) Follow up of the flying Hamburger? High speed diesel train (100 mph).
https://cdn.trainorders.com/attachments/thumbs/1579000/4_613fa417a3438.jpg

5) E44 electric locomotive. 55 mph speed. Freight and passenger service. All eight wheels used for propulsion.
https://cdn.trainorders.com/attachments/thumbs/1579000/5_613fa41f6e214.jpg

And 6) E94 electric locomotive. 55 mph top speed. Heavy freight trains. Co'Co'.
https://cdn.trainorders.com/attachments/thumbs/1579000/6_613fa42a19ae4.jpg

Some shots of the locomotive cabs to follow...



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/13/21 12:57 by petmew.








Date: 09/13/21 12:47
Re: Some station pictures of German ICE-trains
Author: petmew

7) The cabs two of the electric locomotives at display in Leipzig Hbf.
https://cdn.trainorders.com/attachments/thumbs/1579000/7_613fa793a4cbd.jpg

8) 
https://cdn.trainorders.com/attachments/thumbs/1579000/8_613fa7a4dcc56.jpg

I think I like the working environment of some of our locomotives better... ;-)
https://cdn.trainorders.com/attachments/thumbs/1579000/IMG_20191018_183038960_613faa7b4dcc3.jpg

 








Date: 09/14/21 01:17
Re: Some station pictures of German ICE-trains
Author: gobbl3gook




Date: 09/15/21 02:22
Re: Some station pictures of German ICE-trains
Author: pennengineer

petmew Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> My  sons aim for this trip was to travel in some
> German high-speed ICE-trains. He's better in
> recognizing them than I am.
> In this trip we did ICE1, ICE2 (is about 0.5 ICE1,
> really), ICE3, ICE-T and ICE4. So I guess we're
> now only missing the new ICE3-Velaro. Well, always
> keep something to do on your list.
>
> The first ICE3 we got between Utrecht and
> Frankfurt Flughafen. It was missing the second
> train-set it was scheduled to run with, but I had
> reserved our seats in the part that was running,
> so no problem.
> Now, in the Netherlands the ICE3 is free to run
> about 100 mph between Amsterdam and Utrecht under
> ETCS level 2 signalling, but because of track and
> suspension interaction and padding in the
> schedule, they usually just run about 85 mph over
> here. In Germany however speeds are often higher.
> Between Duisburg and Düsseldorf was our first
> stretch of about 12 miles where the train ran
> about 125 mph. Being an eight car light weight
> train, with four motorcars, accelerating to that
> speed is done quickly by this EMU.
> After Cologne (well, after Siegburg) the train is
> free to speed at 185 mph towards Frankfurt
> Flughafen Fernbahnhof.
>
> In Frankfurt the DB-app warned us, that our train
> towards Kassel Wilhelmshöhe would not be able to
> stop at Frankfurt Flughafen. But the app suggested
> a train to Frankfurt main station, where we would
> still catch our train.
> Well, as a matter of fact, we bought some
> sandwiches at Flughafen and missed our first
> alternative, but trains are not rare in Germany,
> so no panic.
>
> Towards Kassel the train runs on 'normal' tracks,
> so speeds were relatively low, I guess about 100
> mph max, often slower because of curves etc.
> Freight train interference would have been
> possible, because they were present, but in
> Germany the dispatchers do try to get freights in
> the siding before passenger trains and especially
> ICEs are on the bell.
>
> 1) Here we have an ICE2 (I think, although they
> look the same as the ICE1 locomotives) leaving
> Kassel Wilhemshöhe. This station was built on the
> first German north-south high-speed line, avoiding
> the old Kassel terminus.
> https://cdn.trainorders.com/attachments/thumbs/157
> 9000/1_613f907cb960e.jpg
> In an ICE2 we headed to Nürnburg. The train was
> missing one train-set, but again, I reserved
> seats.
> In Nuremberg we got our Covid tests, because in
> Bavaria that was needed to get into restaurant and
> hotel (my son received his second vaccination a
> couple of days earlier).
>
> The German population is not concentrated in one
> or just a few cities, but every couple of dozens
> of miles you'll find a city more or less worthy of
> having an ICE stop. So in Germany they are still
> upgrading existing lines to 125 mph speed. And
> especially in eastern Germany new high speed lines
> are being built, making more speedy connections
> between parts of the country. Those new lines are
> for the 185 mph speeds. Because the old LZB
> signalling system is outdated and because
> everybody wants ETCS, especially the EU, those new
> lines are fitted with ETCS level 2, baseline 3.
>
> 2) Here's a ICE-T leaving Erfurt. T stands for
> tilting, so the train can take curves at a
> somewhat higher speeds on certain tracks. We were
> in one of those, too.
> https://cdn.trainorders.com/attachments/thumbs/157
> 9000/2_613f90863aa6a.jpg
>
> Further towards Leipzig I had planned to take a
> new-ish ICE4. They come in two lengths. Some of
> the newer ICE-trains are now longer developed to
> run (over) 200 mph. As I wrote before, there are
> just too many stops to need only very high speed
> trains. Pretty high speed (140-150 mph) is fast
> enough, as long as you can quickly accelerate and
> brake.
>
> 3) Here's an ICE4 leaving Leipzig main station. If
> there are model railroaders reading, this one
> gives you a nice weathering suggestion...
> https://cdn.trainorders.com/attachments/thumbs/157
> 9000/3_613f908f713f5.jpg
>
> Some old trains in Leipzig to follow...

Here's an overview of the ICEs by class number -- I'll leave it to you to determine which you have traveled with:

Class 401 -- ICE 1: These can be found in the original 12-car version or as of this year also in the refurbished, shortened 9-car version, the latter being known as "ICE L", the "L" standing for "Lebensdauerverlängerung", which translates to "Life-span lengthening". Can also be operated in Austria and some sets in Switzerland as well.
Class 402 -- ICE 2: As you wrote, essentially half of an ICE 2, but with a bistro rather than full-fledged dining car, and the ability to couple together; therefore often used on routes that split to offer direct service to two different destinations.
Class 403 -- ICE 3: Eight-car train for service within Germany, max speed 300 km/h.
Class 406 -- ICE 3M: Multi-system variant of the ICE 3, used on services to Belgium and the Netherlands (and previously France as ICE 3MF, before being replaced by Class 407). Easily identified by the additional pantographs for use on various foreign networks.
Class 407 -- ICE 3 Velaro: Subsequently procured ICE 3s, also capable of operation in France.
Classes 411 and 415 -- ICE T, seven- and five-car versions, respectively, outfitting with tilting ability.
Class 412 -- ICE 4, found in both the "standard" 12-car and as of this year also the "XL" version with 13 cars.
Class 605 -- ICE TD, diesel version of the ICE T, no longer in passenger service, but two units still deployed as "train labs" by DB Systemtechnik (rail technology subsidiary of DB).



Date: 09/15/21 09:32
Re: Some station pictures of German ICE-trains
Author: SOO6617

As of earlier this year the ICE-1 sets have officially stopped running in Switzerland and been replaced with ICE-4 sets. Unofficially on at least two occassions an ICE-1 has replaced the scheduled ICE-4 set. The ICE-1, ICE-2, and ICE-4 sets are limited to a top speed of 249 kph. This is because regulations are much stricter for equipment to run at 250 kph or faster. Germany only has two lines where speeds are greater than 250 kph, the Rhein-Main NBS between Siegburg and the Frankfurt Airport, and the portion of the NBS north of Erfurt. These two lines are where the ICE-3 sets are used.



Date: 09/15/21 12:00
Re: Some station pictures of German ICE-trains
Author: pennengineer

SOO6617 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> As of earlier this year the ICE-1 sets have
> officially stopped running in Switzerland and been
> replaced with ICE-4 sets. Unofficially on at least
> two occassions an ICE-1 has replaced the scheduled
> ICE-4 set. The ICE-1, ICE-2, and ICE-4 sets are
> limited to a top speed of 249 kph. This is because
> regulations are much stricter for equipment to run
> at 250 kph or faster. Germany only has two lines
> where speeds are greater than 250 kph, the
> Rhein-Main NBS between Siegburg and the Frankfurt
> Airport, and the portion of the NBS north of
> Erfurt. These two lines are where the ICE-3 sets
> are used.

Correct, although the top speed of the ICE 4 is now being raised to 265 km/h.

Posted from iPhone



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/16/21 10:53 by pennengineer.



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