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Eastern Railroad Discussion > Signal Aspect


Date: 05/08/07 05:45
Signal Aspect
Author: dharris

What does the yellow circle with the "G" indicate here?

For those wondering where this might be, it's Doe Gully on the Magnolia Cutoff in West Virginia. There used to be a mountain over this until the B&O daylighted the tunnel here a few years back.

dharris





Date: 05/08/07 05:58
Re: Signal Aspect
Author: Chatanuga

That indicates a grade signal where stopping a train for a stop signal would make it difficult to start because of the grade. If I remember right, trains are allowed to pass a "stop" grade signal at restricted speed.

Kevin
http://chatanuga.org



Date: 05/08/07 06:06
Re: Signal Aspect
Author: csxt4617

Chatanuga is correct...in addition, they also placed them on signals near hotbox detectors,
as many of them don't work properly if a train stops on them. They're pretty much redundant
on CSX now, as a regular red permissive signal is "Restricted Proceed" anyway. But when
they were placed on the signals, the red permissive was "Stop and Proceed"



Date: 05/08/07 07:19
Re: Signal Aspect
Author: Indy38

Those signals look mighty familiar Dirck!



Date: 05/08/07 08:05
Re: Signal Aspect
Author: a737flyer

I have seen this type of signal in California at a tunnel intrance. The explanation I got was the same - not a good place to stop because of the grade, so proceed at slow speed.

But do you proceed to the next signal? I was also told these were used for only short stretches...before tunnels and other restrictions where a second signal would remove the restriction, or continue it.



Date: 05/08/07 08:10
Re: Signal Aspect
Author: dharris

There's a tunnel entrance just out of sight as the tracks curve to the left.



Date: 05/08/07 08:22
Re: Signal Aspect
Author: CShaveRR

a737flyer Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I have seen this type of signal in California at a
> tunnel intrance. The explanation I got was the
> same - not a good place to stop because of the
> grade, so proceed at slow speed.
>
> But do you proceed to the next signal? I was also
> told these were used for only short
> stretches...before tunnels and other restrictions
> where a second signal would remove the
> restriction, or continue it.

Yes, you would proceed without stopping at restricted speed until the next signal, however far away that signal would be. The only thing the "G" (or "P" on some railroads, for "Permissive") does is to eliminate the requirement to stop at a signal that otherwise would require you to stop before proceeding at restricted speed.



Date: 05/08/07 08:45
Re: Signal Aspect
Author: Gateway97

...also you would be on the lookout for the rear markers of a train stopped or moving ahead of you in the block. I have seen trains following each other line-of-sight at restricted speed out on the road through red permissive signals. Another thing you would be on the lookout for is washouts/broken rails,etc. that may have broken the track circuit and dropped the signal to red. Restricted speed assures that you would see any obstruction well in advance, giving you time to stop. Most rules are written with "be prepared to stop short of train or other obstruction" or something like that.



Date: 05/08/07 10:44
Re: Signal Aspect
Author: csx4798

These signals are "intermediate signals" not controlled by the train dispatcher. CSX has been replacing signals with the "G" or "P" with new signals with just a number plate.



Date: 05/08/07 12:12
Re: Signal Aspect
Author: toledopatch

Just to address one of the tangents that started in this thread, there are plenty of "G"-plate signals in areas that don't have tunnels nearby. Since many tunnels are located in areas with grades, it's not surprising that there are "G"-plate signals near them, but as far as signalling goes, the presence of a tunnel is usually irrelevant unless a tunnel is door-equipped. In that case, there's usually an absolute signal interlocked with the door to dissuade engineers from smashing through the door....



Date: 05/08/07 13:58
Love those CPL's ...
Author: prr4828

Hi

Is the crossover (at Orleans Road) behind you in the above photo?

* JB *

> For those wondering where this might be, it's Doe
> Gully on the Magnolia Cutoff in West Virginia.
> There used to be a mountain over this until the
> B&O daylighted the tunnel here a few years back.
>
> dharris



Date: 05/08/07 14:02
Re: Love those CPL's ...
Author: NJTMatt

Does the G on CSX only apply to freights? I ask because we have some on the corridor but according to Norac the Grade maker is for freights only, passenger trains must stop and proceed at restricted speed.



Date: 05/09/07 14:47
Re: Love those CPL's ...
Author: dharris

The crossover at Orleans Road is abut 2 miles behind me in the shot. You're looking west, more or less.



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