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Model Railroading > Layout Design Conundrum Part 2


Date: 06/21/20 21:13
Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: D0wnt1me

Hi Everyone, 

I've returned for more advice on the design of my future shelf layout. First off, I've made a few changes since my last post; 

1. To allow for better clearance space in my bedroom, I've shrunk the layout down to 18" in width.

2. My structure woes have been solved! I plan on building most of the structures from DPM's Modular Building System. I picked up the Learning Kit this week and so far I really like what I see. 

My new problem:
I've been trying to think of ways to fill up the space marked out with the red lines. I'm hesitant to put structures there because I want the space somewhat open so as to provide easier access to turnouts. Water scene? Open field? I'm eager to recieve your opinions.

As always, your replies are much appreciated.


-Dean 

P.S. 
I plan on modeling the layout as a fictional Pacific Electric Branchline named "The Warehouse District". The "yard" towards the right side of the layout consists of 2 interchange tracks with the SP and a team track at the top of the lead. I envision a SP sw1 with trolley polls working the layout. I really like the look of interurban catenary wire and think it would be fun to model.

EDIT: A few people have brought to my attention that catenary wire across the whole layout could be problematic for hand access to ground throws and coupling/uncoupling rolling stock. Perhaps I should just run a singular string of catenary wire across the mainline? Would make for a neat photoshoot with a redcar infront of a small passenger station. 
 



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/22/20 08:21 by D0wnt1me.




Date: 06/21/20 22:46
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: RRBaron

I think a "water scene" is highly inappropriate for in Los Angeles, even the LA River is paved. Maybe a parking lot for employee cars and railroad owned truck trailers would work. It certainly would be more like LA, and it would be low enough for viewing. Also, maybe a film set for a cops & robbers movie? 



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/21/20 22:50 by RRBaron.



Date: 06/22/20 00:12
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: ts1457

Still late forties and early fifties?

A gasoline and oil distributor would not need much in the way of structures, but would allow you to use some flashy tank cars.

I doubt Southern California needed much coal for home heating, but maybe foundries did. A simple coal yard with a single pit and a conveyor loading a coal dump truck would not block much. Just assume the office is off of the edge of the module.

edit: I found some pictures of PE freights. Lots of tank cars, but only a few cars of coal in gons, so maybe the coal yard is not a good idea. I see some gons with scrap metal, so maybe a scrap dealer would be a possibility.

 



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/22/20 00:46 by ts1457.



Date: 06/22/20 02:54
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: SeaboardMan

When you mentioned access to the turnouts are you planning to "hand throw" them?  You will have a hell of a time trying to get your hands in between all that overhead wire.  My P48 switching layout has working overhead and the layout is high so my hands go under the wire, not so much clearance in HO.  Also, and not to put a dampener on things, if this is above your bed how are you going to reach the back, assuming your bed is 24-30 inches wide and the layout is against the wall.  

Before  you invest millions in this I would try this:  go ahead and buy/build the base.  Lay out two of the back tracks and see how it will work or not.  If you are falling over the bed reaching the back better to know now than later.  If this will be a tempoary layout that can be moved and perhaps operated from a different location looks to be a great little layout.

Good luck and Let us know how this transpires.



Date: 06/22/20 04:11
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: Lighter

> I really like the look of interurban
> catenary wire and think it would be fun to model.

Hanging working wire on this will be a learning experience, to say the least.  

 



Date: 06/22/20 06:08
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: AVR3001

You could add a perpendicular "T" intersection to your road, run the new road to the right, parallel to the railroad right-of-way, and then turn a right hand corner to the edge of the layout.  I used a road in a similar vacant space.  Roads actually have a lot of interesting detail.  The trailer idea would work especially well with the road, as trailers are commonly parked along the shoulder of industrial district roads and railroads.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/22/20 06:13 by AVR3001.



Date: 06/22/20 07:16
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: ts1457

SeaboardMan Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> When you mentioned access to the turnouts are you
> planning to "hand throw" them?  You will have a
> hell of a time trying to get your hands in between
> all that overhead wire.  My P48 switching layout
> has working overhead and the layout is high so my
> hands go under the wire, not so much clearance in
> HO. 

I believe the trolley poles on the PE diesel locomotives were for signal activation only, so a pole would not likely be up in an industrial switching area. The PE had freight motors in the early fifties, so if you stuck with the overhead, I'd get me a motor model. The diesel still could make an occasional appearance. Besides the problem of operating the switches, you would have the problem of uncoupling. You might need to go with the old Kadee delayed action magnetic ramps to help with that.
 



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/22/20 08:21 by ts1457.



Date: 06/22/20 08:14
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: D0wnt1me

SeaboardMan,

The layout will be on the opposite side of the room from my bed. I plan to make the layout the standard 42" tall. I do plan on using hand throws and you make a good point of overhead wire getting in the way -  perhaps its not so good of an idea...

-Dean

 



Date: 06/22/20 09:04
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: D0wnt1me

ts1457,

I didn't know that about the PE Diesels. After reading the comments, I think I will just do catenary on the main. In that case, would something like this Baldwin VO-1000 be more prototypical for industrial switching (working with the poles down)? 

-Dean



Date: 06/22/20 09:22
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: ts1457

D0wnt1me Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> ts1457,
>
> I didn't know that about the PE Diesels. After
> reading the comments, I think I will just do
> catenary on the main. In that case, would
> something like this Baldwin VO-1000 be more
> prototypical for industrial switching (working
> with the poles down)? 
>
> -Dean

Hi Dean, I am not a PE expert, but I think you are on to an interesting project.

I think either the VO-1000 or the SW-1 would work. The VO-1000 might be used where the switching was heavier. Personally, I am a fan of the VO-1000. I think you could also have a GE 44-tonner.

I don't know whether you have more room along the wall, but I could see having modules which temporarily tack on the ends for staging during operating sessions. Having to dodge scheduled Red Cars while switching would be a interesting addition.
 



Date: 06/22/20 09:24
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: D0wnt1me

Trust me, if I had more room I’d be building a bigger layout ;)

-Dean

Posted from iPhone



Date: 06/22/20 12:30
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: RGZ17

How about a simple Team track with a basic wood loading dock and possibly a gantry crane. Or perhaps just a track with an auger or two for unloading covered hoppers. 



Date: 06/22/20 13:31
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: D0wnt1me

I already have a team track, at the top of the yard lead. I plan on using Walther's Team Track Scene Kit (thats if I can find one)...

-Dean



Date: 06/22/20 15:37
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: birdman

Members of the East Penn Traction Club have been building and operating trolley and interurban lines in all scales from N to 3/4 inch scale for decades with overhead catenary and/or  simple trolley wire.  That includes freight operation as well as passenger service.  Suggest that you go to the extensive club web site at eptc.org to look at photos, module and layout standards, and to get some ideas and to see what has worked for the 400+ members of the club.  



Date: 06/22/20 16:15
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: NSyorktown

Have you thought about a trackside MOW facility?
I once created this diorama for a 100' x 100' display contest.
Most MOW facilities are low-profile, and would allow you to "park" some interesting vehicles at the edge of the layout, in full view for guests.
Just an idea.
 



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/22/20 16:17 by NSyorktown.




Date: 06/22/20 16:52
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: RRBaron

At very least add a couple of oil pumps. They are scattered all over the LA basin in low rent and high rent areas. 



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/23/20 07:46 by RRBaron.



Date: 06/22/20 21:46
Re: Layout Design Conundrum Part 2
Author: jcaestecker

Grteat suggestions everyone.  I myself would opt for the MOW yard or scrap metal facility.  Both would fit in L.A. and in your tight spot.

-John



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