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Date: 01/08/22 14:52
Insulating paint
Author: steeplecab

I'm doing some repairs on an 89 ft flatcar that I put a FRED on at least a decade ago. All the electronics are contained in the frame, but the leads to the LED are exposed where they come up onto the coupler. (The coupler is a plastic Kadee.) When I first did this conversion many years ago I painted the leads with a black insulating paint. They need to be recoated, but I don't recall what I used for that before other than it was in a relatively small jar. Does anyone have suggestions for a brush-on insulating paint in black?

Dano
Montana



Date: 01/08/22 15:04
Re: Insulating paint
Author: Jeff_Johnston

Dano:

Visit your local hardware store and look for Liquid Electrical Tape. It's a viscous liquid, available in several colors, more or less a liquid form of plastic insulation on wire, that can be brushed on a desired surface. Works great, and dries really tough.

Jeff Johnston
 



Date: 01/08/22 21:56
Re: Insulating paint
Author: mcdeo

+1 for liquid electrical tape. Big box stores also carry it and online stores. 

Mike ONeill
Parker, CO



Date: 01/08/22 22:25
Re: Insulating paint
Author: railstiesballast

One jar ought to do about 12,000 FREDs.
I use it often but it only lasts about 2-3 years after opening.
I've never worked down to the bottom of the jar, but I never want to be without it.



Date: 01/09/22 16:18
Re: Insulating paint
Author: BAB

Hmm solution possibly for my MM( ON30 engines needs something just hoping I can find the shorts. Yes I turn the lights off and have found some but not all.
 



Date: 01/09/22 17:56
Re: Insulating paint
Author: up833

Spray or dip: Plasti-Dip Spray or Rust-Oleum dip. Most often used to coat tool handles with an insulating better grip.
RB



Date: 01/09/22 23:13
Re: Insulating paint
Author: sf1010

I think most of the products mentioned are quite viscous, and probably tough to manage on small things.  Maybe low viscosity varnish would be easier to control.

https://www.mgchemicals.com/products/conformal-coating/varnish-for-electronics/red-insulating-varnish/



Date: 01/10/22 07:59
Re: Insulating paint
Author: PHall

sf1010 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I think most of the products mentioned are quite
> viscous, and probably tough to manage on small
> things.  Maybe low viscosity varnish would be
> easier to control.
>
> https://www.mgchemicals.com/products/conformal-coa
> ting/varnish-for-electronics/red-insulating-varnis
> h/

This sounds like the stuff that's on magnet wire.



Date: 01/10/22 13:29
Re: Insulating paint
Author: steeplecab

Thank you to everyone who replied. I will give the liquid electrical tape a try.

sf1010 noted "I think most of the products mentioned are quite viscous, and probably tough to manage on small things."

I am somewhat concerned about this, but I'll play with it and see. The original product was something from one of the model paint manufacturer's line and came in a small bottle like hobby paint. I remember when we used to do more modeling and had more of these products available. [sigh]

Dano
Montana
 



Date: 01/10/22 16:12
Re: Insulating paint
Author: sf1010

PHall Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> sf1010 Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > I think most of the products mentioned are
> quite
> > viscous, and probably tough to manage on small
> > things.  Maybe low viscosity varnish would be
> > easier to control.
> >
> >
> https://www.mgchemicals.com/products/conformal-coa
>
> >
> ting/varnish-for-electronics/red-insulating-varnis
>
> > h/
>
> This sounds like the stuff that's on magnet wire.

Probably similar.  Magnet wire is often referred to having "enamel" insulation.



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