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International Railroad Discussion > Cargo Trains?


Date: 08/04/22 05:46
Cargo Trains?
Author: RDG630

Why in many foreign countries are what are called freight train trains in the U.S. referred to as cargo trains?

Posted from iPhone



Date: 08/04/22 07:59
Re: Cargo Trains?
Author: PHall

Same reason engineers are called drivers and conductors are guards, because that's what they do in their country.



Date: 08/04/22 10:40
Re: Cargo Trains?
Author: TAW

PHall Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Same reason engineers are called drivers and
> conductors are guards, because that's what they do
> in their country.

...and in South Africa a truck is a freight car for us and a bogie is a truck for us

TAW



Date: 08/04/22 11:09
Re: Cargo Trains?
Author: Notch7

The difference in language tickled me one day.  I had dropped my Bricklin sports car off at the local Porsche-Audi dealership to be worked on.  The dealership gave me a ride to the railroad yard.  I shared the ride with a German businessman in a three piece suit going uptown.   I was in dirty striped overalls and cap.  He turned to me while were we riding and in a thick German accent phonetically said : "Zo, you drive ze cargo train".  In my usual Carolina drawl I responded to him : "Yeah buddy".



Date: 08/04/22 11:35
Re: Cargo Trains?
Author: pedrop

In portuguese spoken in Brazil, all the trains type C are "cargueiros" that means "cargo ship" in english. So, the word freight here is less common used than cargo.

Posted from Android

Pedro Rezende
Vespasiano, MG
https://youtube.com/c/minasgeraisrailways1



Date: 08/06/22 07:41
Re: Cargo Trains?
Author: masterphots

 I'll add another term to the discussion.  In many nations,  a meet is known as a cross,  as in 'where will the trains cross?"   Here in Chile (both in Spanish and English)  cars are wagons, trucks are bogies,  freight is cargo and meets are crossings (cruz in Spanish). 



Date: 08/06/22 07:52
Re: Cargo Trains?
Author: TAW

masterphots Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
>  I'll add another term to the discussion.  In
> many nations,  a meet is known as a cross,  as
> in 'where will the trains cross?"   Here in
> Chile (both in Spanish and English)  cars are
> wagons, trucks are bogies,  freight is cargo and
> meets are crossings (cruz in Spanish). 

Crossing is derived from the lines representing the trains on a traffic (stringline) diagram.

TAW



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