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Date: 04/18/19 06:52
Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: 251F

I'm starting to receive a window from Microsoft when I power up my 10 year old Dell gently reminding me that on 14 January 2020, Windows 7 is officially retired.  No more extended support. No more security updates.  No more 32 bit support-Yikes!  I still have old applications that are 32 bit and will not work with Win10 because of the lack of 32 bit support.

Time marches on. 

daniel

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-update/windows-7-official-support-end-date/c7fba52e-a273-4235-a000-030d956bb1a0
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/13853/windows-lifecycle-fact-sheet



 



Date: 04/18/19 07:59
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: jst3751

251F Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I'm starting to receive a window from Microsoft
> when I power up my 10 year old Dell gently
> reminding me that on 14 January 2020, Windows 7 is
> officially retired.  No more extended support. No
> more security updates.  No more 32 bit
> support-Yikes!  I still have old applications
> that are 32 bit and will not work with Win10
> because of the lack of 32 bit support.

HUH? News to the IT industry. 32bit applications (including Office 32bit) are absolutely fully supported and still being produced.

Do you mean a 16bit application? There are third party "proxy" programs that will run those.



Date: 04/18/19 09:57
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: 251F

jst3751 Wrote:

>
> HUH? News to the IT industry. 32bit applications
> (including Office 32bit) are absolutely fully
> supported and still being produced.

Win10 support of 32 bit applications.  Unless I'm missing something (entirely possible), the 32 bit applications I have will not load in Win10 giving a message of "no 32 bit support".

Yes, there is a 32 bit version of Win10 if updated from a 32 bit version of Win7.  However, I had 64 bit Win7 in another machine and that's the version Win10 Microsoft updated.

https://www.howtogeek.com/228042/how-to-switch-from-32-bit-windows-10-to-64-bit-windows-10/

>
> Do you mean a 16bit application? There are third
> party "proxy" programs that will run those.

Oh my, no 16 bit application.

d.

edited to add Win10 32 bit



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/18/19 10:06 by 251F.



Date: 04/18/19 10:49
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: jst3751

251F Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> jst3751 Wrote:
>
> >
> > HUH? News to the IT industry. 32bit
> applications
> > (including Office 32bit) are absolutely fully
> > supported and still being produced.
>
> Win10 support of 32 bit applications.  Unless I'm
> missing something (entirely possible), the 32 bit
> applications I have will not load in Win10 giving
> a message of "no 32 bit support".

What exact application including version? It is probably an incompatibility. Is this happening when installing or when running? If when running, you might have to configure it to run in compatibility mode.

Office 2000 is a 32 bit application but it is not compatible with Windows 10 OS, 32 bit or 64 bit. Just because an application is 32 bit does not mean it will run on future OS. Another example are graphics programs. They are notorious for being version dependant.
 



Date: 04/18/19 13:36
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: robj

Question?????????????  Why do you need support to run an old application or computer.  The platform is stable, the software is stable.  As long as you do not try to update them they should run fine.

I have a Dell Vista, which I think is no longer supported.  I print on an Epson 3880, scan from a V-700, run an old version of PS, go on the net with Firefox which gets updated.
It is a larger screen laptop than the one I use daily and have the new PS subscription.  If I get a new progran like Turbo Tax, I dont ty to put it on an old system.
No support means no more updates which is ok with me for an old system.

I recently fired up an old XP looking for some old text files, works just fine and I'd guess any old programs would work fine.  I read once lots of the thrid runs on old systems tho of course they probably have local experts.

Bob Jordan



Date: 04/18/19 17:12
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: joemvcnj

Does the current Office work on Windows 7 ?
I am still on Excel and Word 2007



Date: 04/18/19 18:35
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: jst3751

joemvcnj Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Does the current Office work on Windows 7 ?
> I am still on Excel and Word 2007

Office 2019 will only install and run on Windows 10.

Office 2016 will only install and run on Windows 7 SP1 and above.

Office 365 will only install and run on Windows 7 SP1 and above.

Office 2019 is nothing more than a one time purchase of Office 365.



Date: 04/18/19 18:36
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: jst3751

robj Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Question?????????????  Why do you need support to
> run an old application or computer.  The platform
> is stable, the software is stable.  As long as
> you do not try to update them they should run
> fine.

Answer, that is not what he is asking.



Date: 04/18/19 18:57
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: robj

jst3751 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> robj Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Question?????????????  Why do you need support
> to
> > run an old application or computer.  The
> platform
> > is stable, the software is stable.  As long as
> > you do not try to update them they should run
> > fine.
>
> Answer, that is not what he is asking.

That is exactly what he is asking!!!

"I still have old applications that are 32 bit and will not work with Win10 because of the lack of 32 bit support."

Answer: He can still use his old programs on his old computer, it is that simple. You don't need Bill Gates sending you updates every other day.


He didn't say he didn't want to buy a new computer.  He didn't say he didn't want to buy upgraded versions of software if is available.  Those are other issues.
Without knowing what the software is I don't know how you can tell what will work with windows 10 or whether it will even install.
There are ways if you want to do the research and take the time but that doesn't seem to be the case here.

Buy a new computer and use the old one for old software, it may crap out before 2020 anyway.

Bob



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/18/19 19:00 by robj.



Date: 04/18/19 20:33
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: radar

robj Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Question?????????????  Why do you need support to
> run an old application or computer.  The platform
> is stable, the software is stable.  As long as
> you do not try to update them they should run
> fine.
>
That's OK, as long as you never use your computer for something that requires security, such as online banking or purchases, and you don't care if you lose files to ransomware.  A computer that doesn't continue to receive security patches is a sitting duck.  It would be fine if it's never connected to the internet.



Date: 04/19/19 11:59
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: jst3751

robj Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> jst3751 Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > robj Wrote:
> >
> --------------------------------------------------
>
> > -----
> > > Question?????????????  Why do you need
> support
> > to
> > > run an old application or computer.  The
> > platform
> > > is stable, the software is stable.  As long
> as
> > > you do not try to update them they should run
> > > fine.
> >
> > Answer, that is not what he is asking.
>
> That is exactly what he is asking!!!
>
> "I still have old applications that are 32 bit and
> will not work with Win10 because of the lack of 32
> bit support."
>
> Answer: He can still use his old programs on his
> old computer, it is that simple. You don't need
> Bill Gates sending you updates every other day.

Yes sir, that is exactly what he asked, albeit mistakenly under possibly misinformation that he understood what was going to happen.

What he was asking was his worry that specifically his programs would no longer work at all on a newer computer. There are many people in certain segments of society that are "sold" on the belief that they must buy new versions because "support" is ending. That is called sales tactics.

While it may to you seem the same, that is an entirely different animal with a program or operating system no longer being supported and becoming out of date with reference to security and "new" features and benefits, which is what you were responding with.



Date: 04/19/19 15:36
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: BRAtkinson

radar Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> robj Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Question?????????????  Why do you need support
> to
> > run an old application or computer.  The
> platform
> > is stable, the software is stable.  As long as
> > you do not try to update them they should run
> > fine.
> >
> That's OK, as long as you never use your computer
> for something that requires security, such as
> online banking or purchases, and you don't care if
> you lose files to ransomware.  A computer that
> doesn't continue to receive security patches is a
> sitting duck.  It would be fine if it's never
> connected to the internet.

Using the demise of Windows XP on a friends' computer as a reference, what happens is that after Microsoft stops providing updates and maintenance, that's the signal to other software companies from security software such as Norton & McAfee to Adobe and even Facebook to stop supporting/updating that version of Windows.  My friends' first 'surprise', about 3-4 months after XP support ended, was that videos in Facebook presented an 'unable to display' message.  Some time later, even Youtube videos would no longer play on his XP computer.  That's when I found a used Windows 7 laptop at a good price and moved him to that.  However, getting one of his favorite CD-based 32 bit programs designed to run with Windows 95 (yes, 95!) run on Win 7 was a trick and a half.

For what it's worth, I still have my XP computer up and running on a KVM switch (shared keyboard, video and mouse) as there's a couple of programs I still use from time to time that would be too costly to purchase the 'upgrade' to run on my Win 7 computer.

However....

I DID find later versions of a couple of installed products I had on the XP box available on ebay for a fraction of the full price if bought new.  The later versions were desiged to work with MS Vista through Win 7.  Using the newer full-install versions and not the then 'current' versions saved me big time!

 



Date: 04/19/19 16:49
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: robj

I know there is disagreement  but in terms of computer security I always think of a radio show "expert".

He talked about safety devices often leading to false security.  Seat Belts, smoke alarms, others not too mention.

So on a computer you practice safe S-- and you should be OK and don't click on an email link to change your password and blame the Russians.

Bob



Date: 04/19/19 23:29
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: norm1153

Good old Windows 7 SP1.  Have four (4)  PC's running it to this day.  I turned updates completely off after the initial installations.  I use both Avast Premier and Malwarebytes for online protection, which is really what MS's updates are about after all this time.



Date: 04/20/19 17:17
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: jst3751

robj Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I know there is disagreement  but in terms of
> computer security I always think of a radio show
> "expert".
>
> He talked about safety devices often leading to
> false security.  Seat Belts, smoke alarms, others
> not too mention.
>
> So on a computer you practice safe S-- and you
> should be OK and don't click on an email link to
> change your password and blame the Russians.
>
> Bob

Bob, I agree with you 100% that practicing safe computer habits is the best computer security defence. The problems only occur when a person does not practice safe computing habits 100% of the time.

However, while I may be wrong since he has not made any further posts, I believe that Daniel's concern is about a supposed and perceived end of certain functionality, not with security, as evidenced by this part of his post: "No more 32 bit support-Yikes!  I still have old applications that are 32 bit and will not work with Win10 because of the lack of 32 bit support." as well as this in his reply to my post: "Win10 support of 32 bit applications.  Unless I'm missing something (entirely possible), the 32 bit applications I have will not load in Win10 giving a message of "no 32 bit support".



Date: 04/21/19 10:23
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: robj

I think this was a good thread, different takes on eventual scenario.   As far as the OP, his problem if there is any, will not take place until the exteneded support ends.  So hopefully there was some information of help.  Obviously support costs Microsoft as it is not just support for security but for all the new features.  And oh yea, they want you to buy new products. 

Bob



Date: 04/21/19 17:11
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: E25

I am still using WIN 7 64 bit because of its stability and my comfort level with it.

When I moved to WIN 7 from XP, I had years of business-related e-mails in Outlook Express which did not convert to other mail programs very well.

My solution was to install XP Professional in a VMWare virtual machine and only run OE in it.  I am still using Outlook Express and it is as stable as a rock.  I can easily access e-mail files going back more than 20 years in nearly 30 sub-folders!

Greg Stadter
Phoenix, AZ



Date: 04/21/19 23:38
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: jst3751

E25 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I am still using WIN 7 64 bit because of its
> stability and my comfort level with it.
>
> When I moved to WIN 7 from XP, I had years of
> business-related e-mails in Outlook Express which
> did not convert to other mail programs very well.
>
> My solution was to install XP Professional in a
> VMWare virtual machine and only run OE in it.  I
> am still using Outlook Express and it is as stable
> as a rock.  I can easily access e-mail files
> going back more than 20 years in nearly 30
> sub-folders!

There are converter utilities available (about $30) that can convert a Outlook Express DBX file to a Outlook PST file.



Date: 04/25/19 06:17
Re: Windows 7 End of Extended Support
Author: SandPatch1

OK, read this and the other thread about windows 10, and the site listed that the FREE Windows 10 update is still available with some requirements,  Well I was able to upgrade from 7 to 10!,,,,,, The Pro version, I only did this as When support for XP ended it was ok but soon no video from you tube would play and was getting more goofy lockup’s, so good. Ew for now,
dj



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