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Canadian Railroads > CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems


Date: 12/14/14 17:32
CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems
Author: eminence_grise

From my daughter, Kylie:

In August 1882 Dominion Express Company was formed as a division of Canadian Pacific Railway for less-carload-lot. Dominion Express became CP Express Company on September 1, 1926 and became the trucking subsidiary of Canadian Pacific servicing Ontario and the Maritimes with its head office moving from Winnipeg to Toronto. In December 1952 Canadian Pacific Railway began piggyback operations. In August 1959 Canadian Pacific formed Canadian Pacific Merchandise Services to roll less-than-truck-load and express services of the trucking companies under one roof on Vancouver Island. In 1960 CP Merchandise Services was headquartered in Winnipeg Manitoba and became the western Canada trucking subsidiary of Canadian Pacific. Canadian Pacific Transport was set up in 1947 to be the piggyback operation in western Canada; CPT subsidiary companies included Okanagan Valley Freight Lines, and Dench of Canada Limited servicing British Columbia and Alberta. In 1954 CP Transport operated 280 trucks and five years later was operating some 3,860 trucks. Phoenix Transportation was acquired by CPT as an operating subsidiary in Saskatchewan. Other CPT subsidiary companies included Expressway Truck Lines of Canada, Vancouver to Penticton Freight Lines, Refrigerated Express, Island Freight Lines, and Cascade Motor Freight both operating in BC.

In 1958 CP acquired a 50% interest in Smith Transport and in 1962 CP acquired 100% of Smith Transport which operated extensive operations in Ontario and the United States. 1967 saw the formation of Highland Transport as the full truckload subsidiary of Smith Transport. In 1967 CP Transport and Smith Transport operated 21,000 unduplicated highway miles, 1,757 trucks, 2,645 highway trailers, 1,251 tractors and employed 7,980 people. In 1968 under the new “Multimark” image program Smith Transport equipment was painted CP Transport Blue. Highland Transport remained a separate but wholly owned subsidiary of CP Express and Transport. In the mid-1970s CP Express, CP Merchandise Services, CP Transport, and Smith Transport were combined to form CP Express and Transport. In 1976 CP began a separate parcel subsidiary called Canpar, this was the first step CP took in spinning off its trucking operations.

In 1971 CP Express and Transport separated its bulk trucking operations into CP Transport, later renamed CP Bulk Systems in 1975. In 1972 CP Transport (London/Maritimes) was formed to transport CP Ships containers inland. On August 9, 1990 CP sold CP Bulk Systems to Trimac Transportation. At the time CP Bulk Systems operated 215 tractors, 400 trailers from 16 terminals in six provinces and one terminal in Washington State. Trimac absorbed the fuel hauling under the Trimac banner and separated the wood chip hauling operations into Trimac Bulk Systems. In the late 1970s CP Transport, CP Express, and Smith Transport were combined to form CP Express and Transport.

Beginning in 1984 CP Express and Transport began a rush parcel service called “Excelerater”. In March 1988 CP Trucks began a US operating subsidiary under the name CP America. CP America acquired the Hiawatha Trucking subsidiary of the SOO Line in May 1988, Hiawatha Trucking was acquired by the SOO Line ad part of the 1985 purchase of the Milwaukee Road. In 1989 CP Express and Transport was reorganized as CP Express and Transport (1989). In 1991 CP Express and Transport had 1,050 tractors/straight trucks, 2,700 trailers operating from 65 terminals in Canada, with Canpar operating some additional 1,000 trucks. Canpar’s United States affiliate was Roadway Package Systems. . Proline Carriers acquired CP America from Canadian Pacific on October 1, 1992.

In 1989, CP Trucks operated a fleet of 2,735 power units and 5, 124 trailers serving a network of over 200 terminals in Canada and seven terminals in the United States.

Maple Shipping Company was founded in 1960 as a company to charter ships to boost Canadian Pacific Ships fleet, however the company was deactivated until October 1971 when it opened an office in London and in April 72 another office was opened in Vancouver as a brokerage agency. Maple Shipping (UK) was rolled under the CP Steamships banner in 1977 following a reorganization. Maple Shipping itself became a division of Crosswind Freight.

During the recession in the early 1990s Canadian Pacific Limited wanted out of the trucking business, following the 1980s deregulation of the trucking industry which caused revenues down and cost up. In 1992 CPET lost $100 million dollars, followed by a $16.5 million dollar loss in 1993. CPET made approximately $175 million per year. In September 1994 CP completed a deal to spin off CP Express and Transport. CP Express and Transport was acquired 10% by management, 20% by its 2,700 employees and 70% by the union. The purchase price was one dollar, this buyout prevented Canadian Pacific from having to buyout (who would receive 80% of their rate of pay for five years under union contract provisions) or pay for early retirement of the 2,700 employees. This buyout represented the largest management led- employee buyout in Canadian history. Interlink was headquartered in Etobicoke Ontario. Under the buyout the company was renamed Interlink Freight Systems in March 1995 and as part of the restructuring 200 employees were laid off (representing a $15 million dollar savings in labour costs), reduced disability benefits, drug and dental plan deductibles raised, long term employees lost a weeks vacation, a three year wage freeze and a five year union contract. Also employees would receive 600-800 shares of Interlink, valued at $2 per share (average share ownership after year five was 4,000), and the employees collectively received 20% of pre-tax earnings as a profit share. Gained as well were job security, increased flexible work rules, and improved industrial relations. Interlink Freight Systems provided transportation and logistics services throughout Canada and the U.S. Consolidated annual revenues of $152.8-million, and had assets worth $49.7-million (1996). 
A 5-year, $30.0-million program to upgrade an aging trucking fleet comprised of approximately 1,000 tractors, 3,000 trailers, 300 straight trucks and 500 fork-lift trucks was implemented immediately. Highland Transport and Canpar were sold off to Westminster Holdings, a Chicago based company, on March 31, 1993. Highland at the time of the sale operated 2,175 vehicles including tractors and trailers. At the time of the spin off CP Express and Transport operated 1,000 tractors, 3,000 trailers, 300 straight trucks and 500 fork lifts. Within a year and a half of the employee buyout, Interlink share prices fell from $2 to 80 cents each. The company laid off more employees and closed terminals in an attempt to turn a profit. In 1996 the company was reorganized in an attempt to turn a profit. However after three and a half years of operations and a loss of over $170 million dollars on July 8, 1997 Interlink Freight Systems declared bankruptcy and ceased operations putting 2,292 employees out of work. Interlink owed millions of dollars to creditors such as GE, CN Rail, Shell Canada and Canadian Pacific Limited. Interlinks existence allowed its employees to make some $300 million dollars in wages and benefits over the three year period of business, as well as the full retirement pensions of 200 employees. Highland Tranport was acquired by Triwest Capital Partners in 2001 and subsequently sold to Transforce in October 2004. Canpar has also become a Transforce company.

CP Express and Transport Numbering System
Lxx Leased tractor (owner operator)
35xx Tractor
36xx Tractor
44xx Straight truck
45xx Straight truck
46xx Smith Transport straight truck
48xx 45’ van tandem axle
51xx 45’ van tandem axle
57xx 28’ non-heated dry van (CPET style), single axle
577x 27’ Phoenix Transportation trailer, white, regular van
6xxx 45’ dry van, tandem axle
76xx 28’ refrigerated van (CPET style), single axle
77xx 28’ non-heated dry van (CPET style), single axle
78xx 28’ heated van (CPET style), single axle
86xx 45’ heated van, tandem axle
87xx 45’ tri-axle (1-tag axle) van

CP Bulk Systems

8200x Pneumatic (cement) tank, tandem axle
8201x Vegetable oil tank, tandem axle
8203x Chemical tank, tandem axle
8221x Tri-axle tank (1-tag axle)
8225x Tri-axle (1-tag axle) pneumatic tank
823xx Super-B petroleum tank

CP America

40178 48’ dry van
40313 48’ dry van

Smith Transport

DT2XX GMC city tractor
5B060-H 45’ Ram dry van, tandem axle
5A096 40’ tandem axle flat
5D227 45’ tandem axle dry van
5D291 40’ tandem axle dry van
5D317 45’ tandem axle dry van
5D706 40’ tandem axle dry van
5R027 Trailmobile 45’ reefer van, tandem axle

Highland

5057 Tractor “Highland transport, a division of Canadian Pacific Express and Transport”
2H212H Heated van

CP Transport/Smith Transport Terminals 1977 Smith handled all shipments east of Lakehead and CP Transport handled all shipment west of Lakehead (Thunder Bay). In 1967 Smith Transport had a New Foundland unit that handled shipment from Esker Labrador to Churchill Falls. Also in 1967 CP Transport operated terminals in Smeaton and Flin Flon Manitoba.


Nova Scotia

Digby
Halifax
Kentville
Truro
Yarmouth

New Brunswick

Fredericton
Moncton
Saint John
St. Stephen
Woodstock

Quebec

Granby
Montreal
Quebec
Sherbrooke
St. Jean
Sorel
Trois Rivieres
Valleyfield


Ontario

Barrie
Belleville
Brantford
Brockville
Cambridge
Chatham
Cornwall
Dryden
Hamilton
Kingston
Lansdowne
Lindsay
London
North Bay
Orillia
Oshawa
Ottawa
Owen Sound
Pembroke
Peterborough
Port Hope
Sault-Ste-Marie
Streetsville
Sudbury
Thunder Bay
Toronto
Windsor

Manitoba

Winnipeg (Brandon*)

Saskatchewan

Regina (Saskatoon*)

Alberta

Calgary (Medicine Hat*)
Edmonton (Red Deer*)
Lethbridge

British Columbia

Campbell River (Gold River*)
Courtenay (Comox*)
Cranbrook (Creston, Fernie, Kimberley*)
Dawson Creek
Duncan
Kamloops
Kelowna
Nanaimo
Penticton
Port Alberni
Prince George
Revelstoke
Trail (Castlegar, Nelson*)
Vancouver
Vernon
Victoria
*indicates daily service from terminal listed.

United States

Albany
Alexandria Bay
Buffalo
Detroit
Jersey City
New York City
Rouses Point
Syracuse
And connecting carriers to and from the United States.


CP Transport Company Limited Operated:
Smith Transport Company Limited, H. Smith Transport Company Limited, Smith Transport (U.S.) Limited, Smith Transport (International) Limited, CP Transport (Western), CP Transport (Maritimes).

Data from: National Highway and Airway Carriers and Routes, No. 72 1977

The photos show, CPET truck at Revelstoke during a highway closure. The models are Kylie's HO scale layout.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 12/14/14 17:40 by eminence_grise.








Date: 12/14/14 17:49
Re: CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems
Author: eminence_grise

Here is the former CPET terminal in Cranbrook B.C. in 2008. 10 years after Interlink went bankrupt.








Date: 12/14/14 17:50
Re: CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems
Author: eminence_grise

Three more.








Date: 12/15/14 08:18
Re: CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems
Author: moonliter

Phil, please thank your daughter Kylie for her great post, it was very informative.

I was wondering how Highland Moving fit in the system. Highland Moving was out of North Bay, ON and were members of United Van Lines. Their trucks were white with the same blue CP multi-marks as Highland Transport. Before deregulation in Ontario one needed a PCV plate to operate. In the case of hauling "furniture & used household goods" a PCV plate "H" was required. General crated or palletized freight required a class "D" PCV plate.

I will always remember the CP advertisement during the CFL football game of a CP Express driver handing a young boy his fully assembled bike down off the back of the trailer. The happy boy hops on the bike and rides away. In those days without a PCV "H" plate this delivery would have been technically illegal.

My questions, was Highland Moving a part of Highland Express or another firm that CP acquired along the way? Which company held the PCV "H" plate?

Gerry Gaugl
Ottawa ON



Date: 12/15/14 10:12
Re: CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems
Author: eminence_grise

moonliter Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Phil, please thank your daughter Kylie for her
> great post, it was very informative.
>
> I was wondering how Highland Moving fit in the
> system. Highland Moving was out of North Bay, ON
> and were members of United Van Lines. Their
> trucks were white with the same blue CP
> multi-marks as Highland Transport. Before
> deregulation in Ontario one needed a PCV plate to
> operate. In the case of hauling "furniture & used
> household goods" a PCV plate "H" was required.
> General crated or palletized freight required a
> class "D" PCV plate.
>
> I will always remember the CP advertisement during
> the CFL football game of a CP Express driver
> handing a young boy his fully assembled bike down
> off the back of the trailer. The happy boy hops
> on the bike and rides away. In those days without
> a PCV "H" plate this delivery would have been
> technically illegal.
>
> My questions, was Highland Moving a part of
> Highland Express or another firm that CP acquired
> along the way? Which company held the PCV "H"
> plate?
>
> Gerry Gaugl
> Ottawa ON


Here's a guess what Highland Moving was all about, based on what I know about another large moving company.

The biggest part of the commercial moving business these days is moving government employees/ military / RCMP around the country to different postings.

The NORAD base at North Bay has and had a large force of senior military personnel who would move around North America, and such moves could keep a moving company busy.

When CP had a large number of middle management positions around Canada who were frequently moved from post to post, a CP owned moving company would also make sense.

After the whole "Interlink" bankruptcy took place, Highland survived for some time . In BC , we saw CPT blue trucks with "Highland, a numbered BC corporation" painted over the cab side markings.

The collapse of "Interlink" took place four years after a similar business failure when "Route Canada" , the former CN Express and Transport went bankrupt. In that case, there was evidence that certain persons were aware that the real estate holdings of the trucking company were very valuable, and that if the trucking company became insolvant, the real estate could be acquired cheaply.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/15/14 11:55 by eminence_grise.



Date: 12/15/14 10:16
Re: CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems
Author: dcmkris

Phil & Kylie,

Thanks for the extremely informative post. It's a shame they are out of the business I kind of liked the looks of the fleet.

Nice job on the model it gives a nice feel for how large an operation most terminals are.

Kris



Date: 12/15/14 16:38
Re: CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems
Author: cpn456

I remember seeing some CanPar trailers on CP intermodal trains back in the early 90's. Was this kind of a version of UPS (United Parcel Service) of Canada?

On a related note, what is the major parcel delivery service in Canada, is it UPS? Do they use rail service like UPS and, to a much lessor extent FEDEX Ground, does here in the US?



Date: 12/15/14 20:47
Re: CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems
Author: tq-07fan

I remember seeing the Interlink trucks and trailers on the Trans Canada. I knew there was some connection with CP Rail but knew nothing beyond that.

cpn456 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I remember seeing some CanPar trailers on CP
> intermodal trains back in the early 90's. Was
> this kind of a version of UPS (United Parcel
> Service) of Canada?
>
> On a related note, what is the major parcel
> delivery service in Canada, is it UPS? Do they
> use rail service like UPS and, to a much lessor
> extent FEDEX Ground, does here in the US?

Purolator https://www.purolator.com/en/home.page which is owned in part by Canada Post is the main parcel delivery service in Canada. Greyhound Canada has a large parcel business as well but not like it was even into the nineties.

Jim



Date: 12/16/14 00:49
Re: CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems
Author: DPKrause

One huge difference between the shutdown of Interlink & Route Canada is that the Interlink employees recieved all of the wages & pensions due to them. Many folks at Route Canada got screwed, particularily the owner operators, many of whom ended up losing their trucks. My current employer hired quite a few former Interlink people in Calgary after the shutdown....most have since retired, a couple are still with us.



Date: 12/18/14 17:19
Re: CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems
Author: Train611

Hi,

I was away for awhile, read the story with great interest...nice work!

An excellent history!

Great looking layout!

Take care,

611



Date: 12/21/14 03:17
Re: CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems
Author: ghCBNS

eminence_grise Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> From my daughter, Kylie:
> CP Transport/Smith Transport Terminals 1977 Smith
> handled all shipments east of Lakehead......

> Nova Scotia
> Truro

A great read!.....Thanks for posting.

I drove through Truro NS yesterday and the old Smith Transport Terminal is still there. It was also the waiting room for the Dominion Atlantic Railway mixed train to Windsor NS.






Date: 12/31/14 08:03
Re: CP Express and Transport/CP Bulk Systems
Author: BCR_766

Does anyone have any photographs of the CP Express building on 109st downtown Edmonton prior to demolition??



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